WYSO

Your Voice Ohio

Your Voice Ohio is a collaborative effort to produce more relevant, powerful journalism based on the needs and ambitions of Ohioans and Ohio communities. Your Voice Ohio is an initiative of WYSO and more than 30 news organizations across Ohio. We’re beginning with the opioid epidemic and will let the public guide us from there.

 

One thousand people are getting killed in southwest Ohio yearly.

By what?

Opioids. Drugs.

Megan Johnson
Basim Blunt / WYSO

This week on Dayton Youth Radio, we have the first of two stories about teenagers dealing with the opioid crisis. Today we'll hear from Megan Johnson, a senior at Centerville High School.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

There’s almost universal agreement more treatment needs to be made available to help Ohio overcome the opioid crisis that killed nearly 11 people a day last year. But a study from Ohio State University says there simply isn’t enough capacity to help the 170,000 Ohioans who are battling opioid addiction. As part of a series on recovery and roadblocks in the opioid crisis, Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports on what experts are saying Ohio needs to focus on now.

Every year hundreds of people gather at the Statehouse with family, friends and others who helped them for the Rally for Recovery.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

There are as many as 170,000 Ohioans who abuse or are addicted to opioids, according to a recent study from the Ohio State University’s Swank Program in Rural-Urban Policy. Abuse of and addiction to prescription painkillers and heroin costs thousands of those people their families, their jobs, their homes and – in the case of nearly 11 people a day last year – their lives. As part of a series on recovery and roadblocks in the opioid crisis, Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports the state’s response to the crisis has gotten mixed reviews.

David Givens
Dan Konik

When opioid addicts try to put their lives back together, it is often difficult to get the housing, jobs, continuing treatment and personal connections they need to stay clean and be successful. As part of Ohio Public Radio’s series on the opioid crisis, Jo Ingles reports on what is being done to help drug abusers get on the right track.

Filling In The Gaps On Path Toward Opioid Treatment

Dec 11, 2017
 Pickaway County jail room
Dan Konik

The opioid epidemic has reached every community in Ohio. Because of this, hospitals, courts and jails have become the front lines of the battle against the crisis. Those nurses, doctors, judges and officers can act as first points of contact that connect addicts to treatment. As part of a series on recovery and roadblocks in the opioid crisis, Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports on unique programs advocates believe are connecting addicts to the help they need.

The Montgomery County overdose death rate remains historically high, with at least 559 deaths countywide this year as of November, as reported by the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office.
Indigo Life / Indigo Life

The number of accidental overdose deaths in Montgomery County has been trending downward in recent months.

Mental health and addiction advocates from the county’s collaborative Community Overdose Action Team say intensive efforts to address the opioid epidemic are beginning to have an impact.

On Thursday in Dayton, advocates presented excerpts from the county’s new Voices Project partnership, part of a national video project to share the stories of people touched by the epidemic.

Opioid overdose survivors can experience physical and mental health problems, long after they're revived with naloxone.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

In Springfield, most calls to the city’s 911 emergency switchboard are related to an opioid overdose.

Some overdose victims will die. Many others will be saved with the fast-acting overdose reversal drug Narcan.

But, for some surviving overdose victims, that’s not the end of the story. An overdose can leave behind lasting mental and physical scars, advocates say.

The​ ​drug​ ​Narcan​ ​can​ ​seem​ ​like​​ ​magic​.​ ​Just​ ​one shot​ ​of​ ​the​ ​powerful​ medicine ​can​ ​literally​ ​bring​ ​an overdose victim ​back​ ​from​ ​the​ ​dead.​

Staff at the nonprofit Springfield addiction-treatment agency McKinley​ ​Hall are participating in a new approach to opioid overdose.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

Clark County has seen a record number of overdose deaths this year. But widespread use of the antidote ​Narcan is also allowing many people who overdose to survive and use again, increasing their risk of dying the next time.

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