WYSO
Joe Mullins and the Radio Ramblers playing with Centerville’s Alternative Strings Orchestra.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Classic Country Radio Thrives in the Miami Valley

WBZI in Xenia is a classic country radio station with a large, loyal listening base—so large that they have 3AM and 2FM signals broadcasting across Southwest Ohio. They play old school bluegrass, country, and gospel. They also keep their listeners up-to-date with news, stock, and farm reports. Their brand of classic country radio is both timeless and current, and it's been gaining popularity.

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Clean Gene Lohman and Sherry Novick at the WYSO studios in the 1970s
WYSO Archives

Rediscovered Radio: Clean Gene’s Record Machine

In 1965, a kid named Gene Lohman came to Yellow Springs to attend Antioch College. He brought with him an almost encyclopedic knowledge of popular music, especially R&B. As a child, Gene had been bed ridden with measles, with only a transistor radio for company. That inspired a lifelong passion for artists recording on labels like Savoy, Chess, and Stax.

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Lori Gravley reads Julie Moore's poem, "The First Time I Saw a Shooting Star."

DVAC’s Art Auction is tonight at Sinclair College. This is their biggest and best, all art, all Dayton, wildly fun, eclectic, affordable, talent-packed, cool, casual, original art party of them all! Doors open at 6:00 p.m. and the live auction begins promptly at 7:30 p.m.

Maxine Skuba reads her poem, "Ohio Life Part 7."

Federal prosecutors are accusing a Jordanian citizen living in Ohio of attempting to travel to Syria and fight with the Islamic State group against the Syrian leadership.

The U.S. Justice Department says 26-year-old Laith Waleed Alebbini was arrested Wednesday at the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport in Hebron, Kentucky.

Alebbini is due in court Thursday afternoon in Dayton, Ohio, where he had been living. Court documents do not indicate whether he has an attorney.

It was 20 years ago that the Ohio Supreme Court found the state’s system of funding public schools unconstitutional. The case was brought by a coalition of hundreds of school districts and named after student Nathan DeRolph. They argued that relying on property taxes for school funding unfairly favored districts with higher property values. The Court agreed. The DeRolph decision was one of many attempts to solve a funding problem, and it won’t be the last.

Ohio Statehouse
Friscocali / Flickr Creative Commons

House Republicans went back to the drawing board to roll out a new budget plan after seeing tax revenues coming up short month after month. The changes include taking out nearly all of Gov. John Kasich’s tax reform proposals and redirecting focus on the drug epidemic.

In his last two budgets Gov. John Kasich has proposed a plan that makes reductions to the income tax, saying he wants to shift the state away from relying on income taxes.

wright-patterson air force base gates
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

A new designation will honor Ohio schools that demonstrate commitment to helping students and families connected to the military.

 State officials announced the Purple Star Award for military-friendly schools during an event Tuesday at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, near Dayton.

Now living in exile, Turkish newspaper executive, Abdülhamit Bilici is coming to Dayton as part of the Dayton Council on World Affairs Speakers Series.

Bilici's talk, entitled Freedom of Press and Democracy, will outline recent political turmoil and government oppression of the media in Turkey.

In this interview with WYSO, he provides some details on what has happened to media outlets in Turkey and how he's dealing with his exile.

 

Biographical information about Abdülhamit Bilici provided by the Dayton Council on World Affairs:

Commentary: EPA and Us

Apr 25, 2017
Paul A. Fagan / Flickr Creative Commons

After World War II, American industry grew rapidly, leading to not only unprecedented wealth and a growing middle class, but also to serious negative effects on the environment.  As industry and population expanded, we learned through poisoned rivers and unbreathable air that there are limits to the capacity of the environment to absorb our waste.  The Environmental Protection Agency was created in 1970 with strong bipartisan support for efforts to remediate heavily polluted urban air and waterways across the country.

Brandon Giesbrecht / Flickr Creative Commons

In the course of my almanack record keeping, I have found that soil temperatures generally follow the normal average air temperatures within maybe ten degrees. But in the spring, the ground often lags behind the weather, remaining cold, and causing considerable anguish to the farmer and gardener.

For example, if your beans go in before the earth is warm enough, they rot where you lay them. “Nothing sprouts,” says the ancient Greek sage, Theophrastus, “before its proper time.” At least I think he said something like that…..

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