Camp A Capella, Wright State University
courtesy of Brody McDonald

How Ohio Became An Epicenter for A Capella

Many people here know the high school pop a capella group 11th Hour—their appearance on NBC’s The Sing Off and their success at competitions. At their peak, choral director Brody McDonald chose a different road for this group that paved the way for the national Camp A Capella at Wright State this week. Culture Couch producer David Seitz looks into how Brody McDonald helped make Ohio an epicenter for pop a capella. When singers in 11th Hour pitch a new song to Brody McDonald, it’s gotta grab...
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Buildings on the northeastern corner of the junction of Fourth and Jefferson Streets in downtown Dayton, Ohio, United States. This block is part of the Fire Blocks Historic District, a historic district that is listed on the National Register of Historic
Nyttend

Downtown Dayton Project Receives $4.5 Million In State Funding

A Dayton redevelopment project has received $4.5 million in state historic tax credits today. Developers will use the credits to restore two buildings in Dayton’s Fire Blocks District, near the center of downtown. In another award, Grandview Hospital received $106,000 in allocated credits. The Elks Building and the David Building will be converted into apartments, shops and restaurants, while Grandview will receive housing updates for employees and students. The funds come from the Ohio...
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CREDIT FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS USER SELBE B

State officials say a $48,000 audit of Ohio's food stamp program found roughly $31,000 in questionable costs, including benefits used by dead people and duplicate payments.

State Auditor Dave Yost released the findings of Ohio's $2.5 billion Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program on Tuesday.

The audit found 36 cases where recipients received about $24,000 in benefits a year after they died.

Nearly $29 million was spent outside of Ohio, indicating that those recipients don't live in Ohio or that they're selling cards and benefits.

Conrad Balliet reads Stella Ling's poem, "C Minor."

John Glenn, Jr. Signed Photograph to Wallace Greene, Jr., 1962 - From the Wallace M. Greene, Jr. Collection (COLL/3093), Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections
USMC Archives

Astronaut John Glenn is getting an airport renamed in his honor in his home state of Ohio.

The 94-year-old former U.S. senator and his wife are scheduled to appear at a ceremony Tuesday to rename Port Columbus International Airport in Ohio's capital city as John Glenn Columbus International Airport.

State lawmakers voted on a bill last month to authorize the renaming. Republican House Speaker Clifford Rosenberger and Democratic Mayor Andrew Ginther are expected at the event.

Experts Discuss Best Body Camera Policies Regarding Privacy, Public Records

Jun 28, 2016
Larry James, general counsel for the National FOP
Andy Chow

Police officers in Ohio’s biggest cities are either already using or about to use body cameras. And experts are trying to get ahead of potential problems by talking about the policies that should be implemented. 

One big question for local leaders on the body camera issue is: when should police officers turn them on and when to turn them off? Larry James, general counsel for the National Fraternal Order of Police, says there have to be strong policies in place so police officers can still do their jobs.

Abortion rights supporters
Jo Ingles

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled against a Texas law that required doctors performing abortions in the Lone Star state to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and required abortion clinics to meet standards for ambulatory surgical centers.  How does that ruling affect Ohio?

State lawmakers have put in place restrictions on Ohio abortion clinics that are similar to those in Texas. So the leader of NARAL Pro Choice Ohio, Kellie Copeland, says the Supreme Court’s ruling against the state of Texas is a victory for abortion clinics in Ohio too.

In 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare (CMS) mandated that all County Boards of Developmental Disabilities cease adult day services by 2019.  In Montgomery County alone, that directive impacts more than 630 adults with disabilities. 

The directive puts a burden on some community agencies that are providing adult daycare who will now have to increase the number of people they serve.

To find out how one of those agencies is preparing for the increase, WYSO’s Jerry Kenney spoke to Dennis Grant – executive director of United Rehabilitation Services of Greater Dayton. 

Coming up in this WYSO Weekend: The Yellow Springs Kids Playhouse production of Alice Although got under way this weekend, and continues next weekend.  WYSO’s Niki Dakota helps us with the details. You’ll also hear how a mandate from the Center for Medicaid and Medicare is affecting organizations who provide day care services for adults with disabilities. See the full program details below.

Tana Weingartner

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton brought her campaign back to Ohio today with a stop at Cincinnati's Union Terminal.  

Some 26-hundred people packed the Museum Center rotunda to hear Hillary Clinton talk about her newly released economic plan. Maria Schade of Cincinnati especially likes Clinton's goal of making debt-free college available to everyone.

“I have two daughters, one who’s twelve and one who’s fifteen so, they’re heading in that direction. I was really excited about that,” She said. “I was also excited that she’s looking out for families.”

In 1935 the city of Detroit, Michigan was in the grip of the Great Depression. Unemployment was high and many of the city's residents were barely getting by. There were some things that happened that year in Detroit that gave the residents something to cheer about. 1935 was a great year for sports in the Motor City.

1935 was the year that the Detroit Tigers won a baseball championship, the Detroit Lions were football champions, the Detroit Red Wings were the hockey champions and a boxer from Detroit named Joe Louis was on his way to becoming the heavyweight boxing champion.

The U.S. Senate race between incumbent Rob Portman and Former Governor Ted Strickland is one of the most closely watched in the country. WYSO’s April Laissle sat down with Wright State University political science professor Dr. Lee Hannah to talk about how the race has played out so far and what to expect next.

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