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People with disabilities say many work environments aren’t set up to accommodate disabilities. This is an additional challenge for people with mobility issues in the workplace, who often need special software or other assistive technology.
Basim Blunt / WYSO

Just Ask: Susan Koller And Tom Webb Talk Job Discrimination

In this installment from our series Just Ask: Talking About Disability , we explore the issue of employment discrimination and access. WYSO producer Anna Lurie introduces us to Susan Koller and Tom Webb, who both have cerebral palsy. They say many work environments aren’t set up to accommodate people with disabilities. And many people with mobility issues in the workplace also need special software or other assistive technology.

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Rodney Dunning / Flickr Creative Commons

Antioch College Student Recounts Charlottesville Violence

An Antioch College student who joined counter-protesters in Charlottesville this weekend says he was disappointed by police response to the violence. Spencer Lee Glazer joined other anti-racism activists in protesting the rally led by white nationalists, who chanted Nazi slogans and carried Confederate flags.

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Welcome to our weekly radio magazine, WYSO Weekend. In this program we've got  the information you’ll need to view the solar eclipse taking place on the 21st, and you'll hear how a local non-profit that feeds families and individuals in need hopes to expand their services. 

This summer, we’re bringing you stories of Ohioans living with disabilities. Today, we explore the issue of employment discrimination and access. And WYSO producer Anna Lurie introduces us to Susan Koller and Tom Webb -- who both have cerebral palsy. They say work environments often aren’t set up to accommodate disabilities. Many people with mobility issues in the workplace need special software or other assistive technology. 

Some Franklin residents waved Confederate flags at a rally Aug. 19, 2017, at the former site of a Confederate plaque. Some residents are expressing anger over the monument's removal overnight by the city of Franklin, citing public safety concerns.
Jess Mador / WYSO

More than a dozen people waved Confederate flags and called for the return of a Confederate monument to its historic location in the Warren County city of Franklin on Saturday, Aug. 19.

The stone-based bronze plaque had sat for decades at the intersection of Dixie Highway and Hamilton Middletown Road before being taken down by city officials overnight last Thursday. 

Robert Paschell reads his poem, "Silence Is My Canvas"

courtesy of Dayton History

The Great Dayton Adventure Race is tonight. The race will take you to all corners of the downtown area, and you are sure to discover new things about our city! You will navigate the city with a map, answering the questions and performing tasks on the clue sheet in this action-packed adventure. 

Let's Clear the Shelters and give a home to animals at the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. On Saturday they are during their NAME YOUR OWN PRICE Adoption Event! This is Noon to 4 pm.

Organizers with a group that planned to protest a Confederate monument in the city of Franklin, in Warren County, say they'll move Saturday's rally to Centerville in light of the monument's subsequent removal by Franklin city officials.

Organizers say they received threats from white supremacist groups after they announced plans to protest the monument -- even after the monument was taken down.

Conrad Balliet reads Gary Pacernick's poems, "Story From the Chemo Ward" and "Track 7"

A decades-old monument honoring Confederate Army General Robert E. Lee has been removed from a street corner in Franklin, Ohio, a city in Warren County.

 Franklin city officials took down the stone monument, erected by Daughters of the Confederacy, overnight Thursday after protest plans were announced in the wake of recent violent events in Charlottesville. "The shaft memorial and highway straight attest his worth - he cometh to his own," the plaque reads. 

It had stood at the corner of Dixie Highway and Hamilton Middletown Road for 90 years.

More than 200 people sang and held candles at a vigil in downtown Springfield Wednesday night in support of the victims of violence at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, less than a week ago.
Dan Gummel / WYSO

More than 200 people sang and held candles at a vigil in downtown Springfield Wednesday night in support of the victims of violence at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, less than a week ago.

Authorities have charged 20-year-old James Alex Fields Jr. with murder for allegedly driving a vehicle into a group of anti-white nationalist demonstrators at the rally. One person was killed and at least 19 other people were injured in the attack.

Liz West / Flickr Creative Commons

When the lilies were still in bloom a month ago, I went counting lily blossoms every day.  I knew that my practice had almost no socially redeeming value. I knew that no one else cared  about the number of lily blossoms in my yard, and that the actual number did not interest me so much as the counting itself.

I recorded the results of counting in my daybook, but  the record did not support theories of climate change. In fact, it supported nothing at all.

So why did I do it, really?  

Heath McAlpine and Mary Ramey of Dayton Indivisible For All pose by the letter addressed to Representative Mike Turner
Kristin Stratman / WYSO

The anti-Trump activist group Dayton Indivisible For All is calling on Republican 10th District Congressman Mike Turner to hold a town hall meeting in the wake of the weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Members of the organization hand-delivered a letter to Turner's office in downtown Dayton asking that Turner openly condemn groups that promote white supremacy and racial violence.

 

 

Organizer Mary Ramey says it’s important for Turner to speak out.

 

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