WYSO
Medications produced by Cresco Labs in Yellow Springs will be available to patients statewide as early as next summer through Ohio’s new medical marijuana program.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Ohio's First Medical Marijuana Greenhouse Breaks Ground In Yellow Springs

Dozens of public officials and advocates gathered in Yellow Springs Thursday to break ground on Ohio’s first medical marijuana-cultivation site. The project is one of a dozen across Ohio licensed by the state just two weeks ago, and it moves forward amid questions over the fairness of state’s medical cannabis licensing process. Illinois-based Cresco Labs’ new 50,000-square-foot, $7 million greenhouse will produce pharmaceutical-grade medical marijuana products. The high-tech, environmentally...

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DCC

Task Force To Probe Dayton Convention Center's Future Viability

Dayton officials announced Tuesday plans to create a task force to assess the condition of the Dayton Convention Center facility, its finances and future development potential. City Manager Shelley Dickstein said in a statement the task force would be led by City Commissioner Christopher Shaw and Chamber of Commerce President Phil Parker. City leaders say the decision follows a feasibility study of the Seventies-era convention center conducted last year by Crossroads Consulting Services....

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Applications are now open for the 2018 WYSO Community Voices class.

Coming Soon: Scratch: Reimagining Innovation In The Miami Valley

Is the spirit of innovation still alive and well in the Miami Valley –– who benefits, and what do you want the future to look like?

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David Garrison reads his poem, "Langston Hughes."

Damarco Brooks
Basim Blunt / WYSO

Today on Dayton Youth Radio, we have a story from a Centerville High School teenager who finds closure about a family mystery.

We live in an affluent consumer society. Many of us have too much stuff and we are obtaining more of it with every passing day. Is your stuff becoming an issue for you? Do you feel like perhaps your life could be better with much less?

Rose Lounsbury got to a point in which she realized that she had too much stuff and that it was having a negative impact on the quality of her life. She decided to do something about that.

David Garrison reads Kathy Fagan's poem, "Cottonwood."

wright-patterson air force base gates
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

President Trump has signed into law a bill that will support jobs and research functions at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) signed by the president contained several bipartisan amendments introduced by U.S. Senators Sherrod Brown (D-OH) and Rob Portman (R-OH).

Brown issued a statement saying the law would, “make sure highly-skilled workers [at Wright-Patt] can continue to do their jobs and help meet national security needs.”

David Garrison reads Debbie Walker's poem, "Let Autumn Come"

Logan Ingalls / Flickr Creative Commons

If you go outside an hour or so before Sunrise, look up to find the Big Dipper high overhead, its winter position before dawn Like the hands of a great clock, the Dipper's motion around the North Star tells the time of year.  When it lies in the west before Sunrise, daffodils will be in bloom. With the Dipper deep along the Southern horizon in the early morning, lilies and roses flower. And when it has moved to the eastern sky, the first leaves are starting to turn for autumn.

Filling In The Gaps On Path Toward Opioid Treatment

Dec 11, 2017
 Pickaway County jail room
Dan Konik

The opioid epidemic has reached every community in Ohio. Because of this, hospitals, courts and jails have become the front lines of the battle against the crisis. Those nurses, doctors, judges and officers can act as first points of contact that connect addicts to treatment. As part of a series on recovery and roadblocks in the opioid crisis, Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports on unique programs advocates believe are connecting addicts to the help they need.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Thousands of West Dayton residents who lack easy access to fresh fruits and vegetables could soon have a full-service food market close to home. The west side has been without a convenient source of fresh produce since 2008, when a neighborhood Kroger grocery store shut down. Since then, city officials have tried attracting a new grocer without success. The story could have ended there. But now, nearly 10 years later, one community group plans to open a co-operative grocery store called Gem City Market. Advocates say it will finally bring healthier food back to the west side.  WYSO’s April Laissle reports.


Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
User: Paradox 56 / Flickr/Creative Commons

Research from the nonprofit Advocates for Basic Legal Equality indicates that few schools in Montgomery County are testing their drinking water for lead. Following school-district surveys conducted in March and July, the agency is urging parents to contact their schools to ask whether they test for lead.

ABLE Law surveyed 54 Montgomery County schools and school districts about lead testing in 2017. Attorney Ellis Jacobs says the group also gave schools information on the dangers of lead poisoning.

 

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