WYSO Curious

Are you curious about the Miami Valley, its history, people or economy? Is there a place, a person or a story that mystifies or intrigues you? Do you like to ask questions? WYSO Curious is an occasional series that lets you ask questions for WYSO reporters to answer. Submit your own question below!

Here are some of the questions we've gotten so far:

  • How does the City of Dayton determine who it rents properties to?
  • What is it like being an independent/local restaurateur in the Miami Valley? How are they doing?

Coming soon: We're currently looking at the future of the Arcade, and the Miami Conservancy District's 100-year-old flood control system—stay tuned in the spring.

Ask your own question here:

WYSO Curious is a partner of WBEZ's Curious City,which was founded by Jennifer Brandel and is one of ten Localore productions brought to life by AIR.

Hear WYSO's Lewis Wallace discuss the growing Curious family with Jenn Brandel and Curious City editor Shawn Allee.

Ways To Connect

courtesy of Nancy Campbell

When Converse Griffith’s question, How did Indian Ripple road get its name? won our April WYSO Curious vote, the investigation seemed simple enough.  This question and subsequent questions about the difference between Indian Ripple and Indian Riffle, an older name for the road, turned out to be quite a mystery for the local and statewide experts we consulted. Not many clear records exist, but we’ve been able to draw several conclusions.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

In just a few months, WYSO Curious has gotten four questions about the same topic: that bright blue lake off of Route 4 in Dayton.

John Todd of Fairborn was the first to write in to our site:

Emily McCord

When Jude Whelley walks her dog in her front yard in Harrison Township, she often detects a syrupy-sweet smell, particularly on moist, foggy nights. Jude has lived in this neighborhood since 1985,  and while the generally accepted wisdom is that the smell comes from the nearby Cargill factory, for years she's wondered "does [the smell] depend on what they’re making? Or does it depend on the weather? Is it dangerous, or is it just unpleasantly sweet?"

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Recently Dave Chesar of Oakwood heard a story we did about the 6,000 abandoned properties in Dayton.

"At the end of the piece it said that the one thing that needs to happen is people need to start purchasing the properties," Chesar said. So he wondered: how do you actually do that? Who do you call? Is there a list? "Who really is the person, or group that can kind of transform those 6,000 vacant and distressed properties into properties that have a name, price and location?"

Are you curious about the Miami Valley, its history, people or economy? Is there a place, a person or a story that mystifies or intrigues you? Do you like to ask questions? WYSO Curious is an occasional series that lets you ask questions for WYSO reporters to answer. 

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