WYSO Curious

Are you curious about the Miami Valley, its history, people or economy? Is there a place, a person or a story that mystifies or intrigues you? Do you like to ask questions? WYSO Curious is an occasional series that lets you ask questions for WYSO reporters to answer. Submit your own question below!

Here are some of the questions we've gotten so far:

  • How does the City of Dayton determine who it rents properties to?
  • What is it like being an independent/local restaurateur in the Miami Valley? How are they doing?

Coming soon: WYSO Curious will take a look at a bunch of questions we've neglected this last year, including: After the great Dayton flood, dams were built on our rivers. Are they still viable or do they need remade? Who built the amphitheater, stone fireplaces, and waterfalls in the valley below Bryan Center? What’s the story with White Lotus Thai restaurant downtown? Those will be online in December and January. And, stay tuned for Basim Blunt's report on what it's like to be a school bus driver.

Ask your own question here:

WYSO Curious is a partner of WBEZ's Curious City,which was founded by Jennifer Brandel and is one of ten Localore productions brought to life by AIR.

Hear WYSO's Lewis Wallace discuss the growing Curious family with Jenn Brandel and Curious City editor Shawn Allee.

Pages

WYSO Curious
6:13 am
Fri June 27, 2014

What Is The Economic Impact Of Street Fairs? WYSO Curious Hits The Pavement

Yellow Springs resident Joseph Minde-Berman (right) plays music at street fairs for spare cash. He has made as much as $300 in a day playing music. He's pictured with his friend Corbin Rogers, also of Yellow Springs.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Strawberries, sauerkraut, asparagus, popcorn, beans, bacon and moonshine—aside from usually being edible, what do they all have in common?

Read more
WYSO Curious
6:00 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Who Put The 'GON' in Oregon? WYSO Curious Pronounces The Answer

Credit Jerry Kenney

Dayton’s Oregon Historic District has a controversial aspect to it: the sound of the word. Unlike the state of Oregon, the end of which is pronounced like “begin", the proper noun used by Daytonians is pronounced Oregon—with an ending that rhymes with John. Dayton resident Jesse Clark asked WYSO Curious—why?

Why is it called the OreGON District? Why don’t we pronounce it the same way people do in Oregon state?

Jesse says he’s been trying to answer the question for quite some time.

Read more
Around the Miami Valley
9:45 am
Tue April 29, 2014

How Did Indian Ripple Road Get Its Name? WYSO Curious Investigates

This 1855 atlas of Greene County (reprinted in 1979 by the Greene County Historical Society) shows the road that became Indian Ripple before it was formally named.
Credit courtesy of Nancy Campbell

When Converse Griffith’s question, How did Indian Ripple road get its name? won our April WYSO Curious vote, the investigation seemed simple enough.  This question and subsequent questions about the difference between Indian Ripple and Indian Riffle, an older name for the road, turned out to be quite a mystery for the local and statewide experts we consulted. Not many clear records exist, but we’ve been able to draw several conclusions.

Read more
WYSO Curious
6:00 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Why is that lake next to Route 4 in Dayton so blue? WYSO Curious takes a trip to Dayton's "Florida"

At the lime recycling plant in Dayton, four more ponds have that blue "Florida" glow.
Lewis Wallace WYSO

In just a few months, WYSO Curious has gotten four questions about the same topic: that bright blue lake off of Route 4 in Dayton.

John Todd of Fairborn was the first to write in to our site:

Read more
Around the Miami Valley
9:43 am
Mon January 27, 2014

What's That Smell In Harrison Township? WYSO Curious Sniffs Out The Answer

Cargill's plant in Dayton
Credit Emily McCord

When Jude Whelley walks her dog in her front yard in Harrison Township, she often detects a syrupy-sweet smell, particularly on moist, foggy nights. Jude has lived in this neighborhood since 1985,  and while the generally accepted wisdom is that the smell comes from the nearby Cargill factory, for years she's wondered "does [the smell] depend on what they’re making? Or does it depend on the weather? Is it dangerous, or is it just unpleasantly sweet?"

Read more

Pages