WYSO Curious

Are you curious about the Miami Valley, its history, people or economy? Is there a place, a person or a story that mystifies or intrigues you? Do you like to ask questions? WYSO Curious is an occasional series that lets you ask questions for WYSO reporters to answer. Submit your own question below!

Here are some of the questions we've gotten so far:

  • How does the City of Dayton determine who it rents properties to?
  • What is it like being an independent/local restaurateur in the Miami Valley? How are they doing?

Coming soon: We're currently looking at the future of the Arcade, and the Miami Conservancy District's 100-year-old flood control system—stay tuned in the spring.

Ask your own question here:

WYSO Curious is a partner of WBEZ's Curious City,which was founded by Jennifer Brandel and is one of ten Localore productions brought to life by AIR.

Hear WYSO's Lewis Wallace discuss the growing Curious family with Jenn Brandel and Curious City editor Shawn Allee.

Ways To Connect

The Taylorsville Dam in Vandalia is one of five dams in the Miami Conservancy District.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

This month marks the 100-year anniversary of the Miami Conservancy District, the flood protection system that was installed up and down the Great Miami River basin after the infamous Great Dayton Flood of 1913.

Listener Ellen Duell asked WYSO Curious a timely question:

“I wanted to know if the dams are still being protected, and how the conservancy district is operating to keep us from more great floods,” Duell said.

Mills Lawn Elementary School in Yellow Springs had the lowest kindergarten vaccination rate in the state in 2014.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

This week on WYSO Curious, we tackle a tough topic: vaccinations. Scott Croshier of Yellow Springs asked, “to what extent is Yellow Springs’ embrace of alternative medicine accompanied by a rejection of vaccination among local parents?”

 

Felix Dakota is happy with a kids' burger and fries from Young's Jersy Dairy.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Kids’ menus: they’re salty, sweet, greasy, and more appropriately portioned than lots of meals served to adults at casual restaurants. So, why the age restrictions? What stops adults from just ordering the small stuff they crave?

This question came in from Rachel Kirby in Nashville, Tennessee for Marketplace's “I’ve Always Wondered” series, a similar project to our local WYSO Curious series.

Tanya Brock is the bar manager at Carrillon Brewing Company, which makes beer the really old-fashioned way.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

In the latest installment of WYSO Curious, Christina from Kettering asked us, “What's with the craft beer movement in Dayton? Has it always been there?”

Bob Moore with Faith and John Morgan in the WYSO studios. arthur morgan
Jocelyn Robinson / WYSO

A few years back, Bob Moore of Yellow Springs took his kids to the public library where he found a shelf of books by local authors. There he discovered the writing of Arthur E. Morgan. Morgan’s creative and original thinking, reflected in these volumes, aroused Bob’s curiosity; he wondered about the voice of this man who had so much influence on the history of Yellow Springs and the Miami Valley, if there were any recordings of him speaking. Bob put the question to WYSO Curious. Hear the radio broadcast here:

The low-lying Serpent Mound winds over a hilltop in souther Ohio, and you can't quite see the head from the tail.
Ann Merrill / Flickr/Creative Commons

The Serpent Mound in Adams County is probably the most famous of Ohio’s many sacred earthworks constructed by prehistoric Native American peoples.

As part of our series WYSO Curious, which lets you ask questions we answer on air and online, Barbara Bayliff of Dayton wrote in to say this:

I am curious about the Serpent Mounds! Is there spiritual power there? What do they mean? How old are they?

James Hicks is the Bearded Barber.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

WYSO Curious, our series where you ask the questions and our reporters answer them, is at it again, this time with a question that might seem clear-cut:

Who is the Bearded Barber?

Kroger in Huber Heights. Experts say if customers show they are willing to drive a few miles to a suburban location, it takes away the incentive for chains to build in limited downtown space. grocery store food
Nicholas Eckhart / Flickr/Creative Commons

There’s a lot going on in downtown Dayton: in some ways, it’s growing. Housing is being built or redeveloped, and small retail and restaurant businesses are taking root. In other ways, it’s struggling, with around a 30 percent vacancy rate for office buildings and a high rate of tax delinquency, including in some high-profile empty buildings like the Arcade.

Nancy Horlacher looks through her collection of frequently asked questions in the Local History Room at the Dayton Metro Library. "Gem City of Ohio: Exact origin unknown."
Lauren Shows / WYSO

“Gem City” — that phrase should sound familiar to most people in the Miami Valley.

A quick glance into the Yellow Pages, or a quick Google search, reveals a list of several dozen Dayton-area groups and businesses that use the name. But what’s that nickname for Dayton all about? Two WYSO listeners, Dot Schnering and Gary Honnert, recently asked the question:

Why do they call Dayton the Gem City?

Will Davis / WYSO

Some people are morning people, even on the weekends: They might like, for example, getting up at the crack of dawn on Saturdays to head down to their local farmers’ market. WYSO listener Gabrielle Civil is not one of those people. She lives in Yellow Springs, where the farmers’ market runs from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. And she had a question about that:

This is WYSO Curious and my question is, why so early? Why is the farmers’ market over by noon?

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