WYSO

Veterans Voices

Veterans Voices is a collaboration between WYSO and Wright State University's Veteran and Military Center (VMC). The project was originally part of Veterans Coming Home, a national public media initiative funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and now receives funding from Ohio Humanities.

The series features stories of Miami Valley veterans who served in a variety of conflicts and branches of service and focuses on the veterans’ stories of re-entry into civilian life. The stories are reported by student veterans attending Wright State University trained in WYSO's Community Voices model. This unique veteran-to-veteran storytelling project is designed to let Miami Valley veterans describe their own experiences, in their own voices.

Veterans Voices is supported in part by a grant from the Jacob G. Schmidlapp Trusts, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee.

Allison Loy

According to the Department of Veteran Affairs, one in four women in the military report being sexually assaulted during their service. The numbers are even higher when unreported cases are considered. Life after Military Sexual Trauma, known as MST, can be challenging, but as Veteran Voices reporter and Wright State student veteran Allison Loy discovered, healing can come from finding ways to help others.

Parenting During Deployment

Feb 18, 2015
Giles Cook / Flickr Creative Commons

One of most challenging times for young children in military families is the deployment of a parent. Today our Veterans Voices series continues as we learn about a doctor’s separation from her newborn daughter, and the unique challenges she faced as a mother in the military. Marine Corps veteran, Wright State University student, and father Jeremy Dobbins has the story.

Dogs Help Veterans Cope With PTSD

Feb 4, 2015
Allison Loy

Approximately 300,000 Post-9/11 veterans are identified as having post-traumatic stress disorder in this country but it’s estimated that only 1 in 3 asks for help. For those who do, different kinds of therapy can help to manage the after effects of trauma. As Veteran Voices reporter and Wright State student veteran Allison Loy has found, many veterans find comfort and support from pets.

A C-123 image from an old Air Force training slide.
Insomnia Cured Here / Flickr/Creative Commons

A new study finds some Air Force reservists could have been exposed to Agent Orange while flying missions in the U.S. Vets who have been denied benefits claims are hoping the Veterans Administration will change its stance on Agent Orange exposure outside Vietnam, and this independent report by the non-profit Institute of Medicine could help their cause.

 

Today our Veterans Voices series continues as we learn about Army veteran Jim Martin who despite being 93 years old, parachuted into Normandy this year to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion. Jim was in the now famous 506th parachute infantry regiment featured in the HBO miniseries Band of Brothers. He was nicknamed “Pee Wee” because he was the lightest man in the unit. At the end of the war, Jim returned to Xenia to build a house, raise a family, and live a modest life. But when Jim got online and connected with social media, his popularity reached celebrity status.

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live.

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This is the first of a three-part series about veteran benefits (Part 2 / Part 3).

Allison Loy

Today our series called Veterans Voices continues as we learn about the Montgomery County Veterans Treatment Court. For Veterans, reintegration back into civilian life after military service can be traumatic. Many vets make this transition successfully, but for others it’s very difficult, and some even commit crimes as a result of service-related trauma. Rather than let these men and women get lost in the criminal justice system, the Veterans Treatment Court was created – and courts like these are happening more around the country.

Jeremy Dobbins

Jeremy Dobbins served four years as an infantry rifleman in Afghanistan, and when he got out in 2012 he found it difficult to talk to people about his military experience. But when he was ready, he chose to tell his stories to an old family friend from Springfield named Charlie Dyke.

Jeremy had joined the Marine Corps at age 17. Charlie enlisted during World War II shortly after his 18th birthday. Both men returned to Springfield after their service ended to raise families and begin new lives.

Allison Loy

Today we begin a new, local series called Veterans’ Voices. You will hear military veterans from the Miami Valley interviewing their fellow veterans. The project is a collaboration with the Wright State University Veteran and Military Center.

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