WYSO

Rediscovered Radio

WYSO’s Audio Archives project began in 2009 when boxes of old magnetic tapes surfaced in a musty storeroom. With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting’s American Archive Project and partnerships with the Greene County Library and other local organizations, over 200 hours of broadcasts, most from the 1960s and 70s, were cataloged and digitized. A project to collect oral histories to complement the recordings was also begun.

With support from Ohio Humanities*, the station has been airing this archival content since early 2014. The collection chronicles events at Antioch College, in Yellow Springs, around the Miami Valley and well beyond.

In our first season, we heard the echoes of the civil rights movement as it morphed into many subsequent movements. As we move into a second season, we’ll explore the Vietnam era, with stories about Vietnam vets, peace activists, the Black Power movement, women’s liberation, and more. We’ll continue to sample news reports, interviews, documentaries, concerts, lectures, music shows, and other historic tape. We’ll listen for our collective present in the voices, and sometimes add contemporary commentary as we reflect on our progress (or lack thereof). We’re also launching the WYSO Archives Blog to provide in depth views into this volatile and formative period of our history, and to highlight our historic preservation efforts.

Archives Fellow Jocelyn Robinson and fellow Community Voices producers Dave Barber, Steve McQueen, and Jason Reynolds will explore this audio treasure trove throughout 2016, and share it with listeners. It’s “Rediscovered Radio: Historic Audio from the WYSO Archives.”

*This program is made possible, in part, by the Ohio Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

National Afro-American Museum

The National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center in Wilberforce opened its doors 26 years ago this April. Rediscovered Radio’s Jocelyn Robinson found historic audio in the WYSO Archives, and offers a look at how the museum has fared over the years.

Back in the fall of 1980, WYSO News aired a story on the National Afro-American Museum project. Even then, according to reporter Brian McCormick, the museum had been in the works for a long time:

Arthur Morgan’s Simple Yet Elegant Solution

Mar 28, 2014
Arthur Morgan seated at his desk at the offices of the Miami Conservancy District on Monument Ave, Dayton, OH.
courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

101 years ago this week, it rained in Dayton. And rained some more. And it kept on raining. It was the Great Dayton Flood. Today though, because of a man named Arthur E. Morgan, communities from Piqua to Hamilton have little to fear from the rising floodwaters of the Great Miami River. 

courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

The controversy began in 1960 at the Gegner Barber Shop located in Yellow Springs, Ohio. The owner, Lewis Gegner, claimed “I don’t know how to cut their (Negro’s) hair” and refused to provide service to African Americans.

By 1960, the Antioch Committee for Racial Equality (ACRE) and the Antioch Chapter of the NAACP were successful in desegregating other businesses in the Village of Yellow Springs. But Gegner refused even after being fined for violating the local anti-discrimination ordinance.

Rediscovered Radio: Historic Audio from the WYSO Archives

Feb 28, 2014
courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

Five years ago, here at WYSO, we found a room full of old and dusty audio tapes in a moldy basement room. They contained programs going back to WYSO’s first broadcast in 1958.

With a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and help from the Greene County Public Library, we began to catalog and digitize more than 200 hours of those tapes, and today we begin to share them with you.

All this year we’ll focus on the 60s and 70s – to show how we lived and how the country was changing.

Pages