WYSO

Your Voice Ohio

Tonya Revilla at the Your Voice Ohio Middletown opioids forum. Revilla has become an activist since her son's fatal overdose in 2016. She has started a petition that requests more programs for addicts and stricter penalties for dealers. She says she has c
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Around 50 people took part in a public meeting on Southwest Ohio’s opioid crisis Monday night at Middletown's MidPointe Library, one of a series of such meetings WYSO is participating in this spring for a project called Your Voice Ohio.

At the meeting, many Middletown residents spoke about the need for more treatment and detox services for drug users. Tonya Revilla lost her son to an overdose 19 months ago.

The Your Voice Ohio initiative brings together Ohioans from all walks of life, to brainstorm homegrown solutions to the opioid crisis.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dozens of family members, advocates, recovering addicts and others affected by opioids shared their stories and experiences Sunday afternoon at a special community meeting held at the downtown branch of the Dayton Public Library.

The event was part of a unique project WYSO is participating in called Your Voice Ohio. The goal of the collaborative initiative is to bring Ohioans from all walks of life together, to brainstorm homegrown solutions to the opioid crisis.

Your Voice Ohio: Using Death To Quantify Compassion

Feb 1, 2018

This commentary is part of Your Voice Ohio, a collaborative effort to produce more relevant, powerful journalism based on the needs and ambitions of Ohioans and Ohio communities.

Your Voice Ohio is an initiative of WYSO and more than 30 news organizations across Ohio. We’re beginning with the opioid epidemic and will let the public guide us from there. 

Learn more about the project and how you can get involved. 

UDRI software engineer, Kelly Cashion (right), adjusts a wireless EEG headset on research engineer Nilesh Powar to demonstrate what a neurofeedback session would look like. Both work in the software systems group at UDRI.
The University of Dayton Research Institute

There is growing evidence that opioids quickly change the brain, making it more likely for users to get hooked and struggle to recover. 

This spring, researchers at the University of Dayton Research Institute will experiment with a new program designed to help opioid addicts retrain their brains, breaking the addiction cycle with neurofeedback therapy.

It’s a method that teaches addicts to rewire the brain pathways associated with drug cravings and withdrawal, officials say. 

One thousand people are getting killed in southwest Ohio yearly.

By what?

Opioids. Drugs.

As journalists, we’re troubled that our aggressive coverage of the escalating death toll and costly side effects of opioids have been without a widespread public mobilization. We like to think we’re providing information that helps the community identify and solve problems, but this one eludes us.

That’s an admission on our part: We care about our communities. We believe 1,000 dead people every year cries out for understanding – and game-changing action.