WYSO

WYSO Weekend

Last week, a WYSO investigation revealed thousands of kindergarten through third grade students are suspended each year. State data also show school officials remove children of color from the classroom much more often than white children. Officials most often cited “disruptive” behaviors as the reason for removing children -- behaviors such as not following directions or talking out of turn. Some advocates are pushing for teachers to seek alternative approaches to classroom discipline. To learn more about what some of those alternatives might be, we spoke with Scott Ervin.

A new WYSO analysis of state education data show Ohio school officials issued 30,000 suspensions to K-through-third-grade students in the 2016 school year. In Dayton, hundreds of younger students are removed from classrooms each year. It’s a problem education policy experts have been trying to tackle for years. Many studies show children who miss too much school struggle to keep up when they return. As WYSO’s April Laissle reports, this is especially true for elementary age students.

 

The 166th Montgomery County Fair opens this month at its new location on Infirmary Road. The site is virtually double the size of the old fairgrounds near Miami Valley Hospital downtown. Last week we got a look at the fair’s new home and spoke with Montgomery County Agricultural Society Board President John Yancik who says the county’s new fairgrounds marks a new beginning for the event.

Data indicates that the Dayton area has some of the highest rates of infant mortality in the country. Health officials say the problem is often related to premature birth and low birth weight. Now, in an effort to bring infant mortality rates down, the Dayton Police Department is joining forces with a home visiting program for families with newborns and young children.

 

 

In the latest installment of our series Bulletin Board Diaries we follow a lede found on a business card at a cafe ... to Cedarville University. That’s where we meet a man who found a creative way to battle his own depression –– through music.

Most people of a certain age have clear memories of the war in Vietnam. This week on Senior Voices, we hear from Brenda Stone. Born in 1939 and raised in Jefferson Township, she worked at the Delco Products plant in Kettering for twenty years. Brenda shared her thoughts on the war - and its impact - with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Hadley Drodge.

The story of Wilbur and Orville Wright has been told countless times. Two completely self-taught, self-funded brothers invent the airplane in the back of their West Dayton bike shop. The world was never the same. But the story of the Wright brothers’ background is even more unorthodox than it seems. In the late 1800s, during the heart of the Victorian Era, the Wright brothers’ mother inspired their mechanical aptitude. Community Voices producer Leo DeLuca has a story about Susan Catherine Koerner Wright.

 

A coalition of West Dayton religious groups is calling for a federal civil rights investigation into the shutdown of Good Samaritan hospital. Premier Health recently announced it will close the medical center later this year. WYSO’s Jess Mador has more. 

More than a hundred years ago, there were two young men at Central High School in downtown Dayton who became lifelong friends. Their lives were both tragically short, but full of consequence. One became Dayton’s first licensed African American doctor—the other the world’s first internationally acclaimed African American poet. Community Voices Producer Leo DeLuca has a story about Dr. William A. Burns, known as “Bud,” and his friend, Paul Laurence Dunbar.

 

This week on Senior Voices we meet Dorothy Johnson, born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi in 1938. She moved her family to Dayton in 1967, and spoke with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Ken Standifer, about her many years working at the Dayton VA. 

Young writers are often advised to "Write what you know." And we've found the young people of Dayton Youth Radio do just that. Project Coordinator, Basim Blunt, introduces us to this week’s story from Centerville High School. 

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