workforce development

Sinclair Community College President Steve Johnson (center) welcomes democratic U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown to the college.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown visited Sinclair Community College Tuesday to talk about shortages in skilled workers—and talk up his part in amending the Workforce Investment Act (WIA). Since 1998, the WIA has funneled billions in federal dollars towards workforce training programs at the state and local levels.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

    

Blame it on the government shutdown: we missed a month of job reports this fall. But during that time, frankly not much happened. Unemployment in the greater Dayton area ticked up from 7.3 percent in August to 7.5 percent in October, with the number of jobs hovering around the October total of 369,600.

This week at WYSO we’ve been talking about the future of manufacturing. A lot of area manufacturers say the business is growing, but they need better-trained young people to carry the torch. They aren’t the only employers struggling to fill job openings, despite high unemployment in the region. So why are so many young people falling through the cracks?

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Manufacturing has been an economic mainstay of the Miami Valley for decades. But manufacturing is changing: today it’s increasingly high-tech, and the industry is struggling to remake its image and get more young people interested.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Montgomery County will hold a forum on workforce development Tuesday from 5:30pm-7:30pm at Sinclair Community College. Area employers and educators will discuss the need for a “talent pipeline” to address a perceived gap between workforce training for young people and available jobs in a changing market.

Local officials want talented young people to be channeled from school, to internships and apprenticeships, to jobs and careers.

Katie McNeil with Miami Machine Corporation is one of many employers who see a growing skills gap as older workers retire.