Wittenberg University

Guest speakers at the event included Stephen Moody, Springfield Police Chief; Anthony Pettiford, Yellow Springs Police Chief; Warren Copeland, Springfield Mayor; Lori Askeland, Yellow Springs Village Council; Jim Hutchins, Wittenberg Police Chief; Denise
Wayne Baker

Law enforcement and public officials attended a town hall forum Monday night at Wittenberg University.  The forum was sponsored by Wittenberg Associate Professor, Julius Bailey's hip hop class, and about 200 students attending used twitter to comment about  the panel discussion, which centered around race, rights and officer involved shootings.

Front and center in Monday night’s forum—the recent deaths of two black men; 18-year-old Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Mo., and 22-year-old John Crawford, III at a Beavercreek Walmart. Both men were shot by white police officers.

Two Wittenberg University administrators have teamed up to to better understand why certain students have trouble transitioning from high school to college.  The academic duo helped the university land one of 19 College Success Grants to fund their study.

Mary Jo Zembar and Jon Duraj recently secured nearly $200,000 in funding from the non-profit Great Lakes Community Investments Corporation.

Duraj shared that part of the funding will be used to hire three first-year success advisers, who will be asking students tough questions that go beyond traditional academics.

Ohio kids playing soccer in 2012.
Wrightbrosfan / Flickr/Creative Commons

This year's World Cup is being played in Brazil, which spent $14 billion to prepare for the month-long tournament. Meanwhile, the  financial and cultural impact of soccer is growing around the Miami Valley.

Soccer is viewed as the “people’s game” outside of United States, according to Steve Dawson, head of men's soccer at Wittenberg University.

Zeb Reichert / WYSO

Wittenberg geology students and the city of Springfield have paired up to reduce pollution in area rivers and streams.  The partnership is expected to save the city money and serve as a learning experience for students.

Buck Creek cuts through the middle of Springfield. Trees line the banks and in the warmer months, kayaking and other activities are common recreation. But there’s a problem. During heavy rains, the sewage system gets overwhelmed.

Sarah K. Fortner

The City of Springfield has partnered with a Wittenberg professor and her Geology class to tackle an ongoing problem with storm overflow waste going directly into Buck Creek during rainstorms. The new partnership has come up with a plan to help fix the problem.

Springfield has an aging sewer system and when it rains all the stormwater goes into the same pipeline as the city's sanitary waste. The city has increased in size but the pipeline hasn't, and so there's an overflow of raw sewage.

This weekend, Springfield's Wittenberg University will be the site for the fourth annual Conflict and Peace in World History Conference. This is the first time the event has been hosted in Ohio.

The conference is part of the Midwest World History Association's attempt to present lectures and exhibits that shine a light on historic events ranging from the American Revolution to recent conflicts in the Middle East.

The July 2013 installment of SOCHE TALKS features Wittenberg University's Tammy Proctor on the myth of the female spy.

The SOCHE Talks are a collaboration with the Southwest Ohio Council for Higher Education. In this monthly series we’ll hear from faculty and staff from areas colleges and universities on a wide variety of subjects. It's an effort to bring Miami Valley research and thinking into the public arena – a way to enlighten the world with local knowledge.

courtesy of Erin Pence

Wittenberg University has awarded the school's highest non-academic award, the Wittenberg Medal of Honor, to The Honorable William A. McClain, class of 1934.
 
McClain was the first African-American member of the Cincinnati Bar Association and also became the first African American judge of the Hamilton County Common Pleas Court.

Recently, Wittenberg University's Board of Trustees announced a plan to cut almost $5 million from the budget over the next four years.  The university's president, Dr. Laurie Joyner believes that the school is on the right track to overcoming a $7 million budget deficit and developing a plan to make the school stronger in the future.

Joyner says that Wittenberg is facing the same type of fiscal problems that most institutions of higher learning are dealing with. And the same types of significant challenges.

Wittenberg University's Concerned Black Students group held its 45th annual Walkout event this week. The event commemorates a 1969 incident when 38 of the school's 45 black students walked off campus when they alleged the university failed to address their concerns about unequal treatment.

Pages