Water

Kevin Jones with the Fair River Oaks Priority Board spoke in front of nearly 100 people at a public town hall meeting on Dayton's source water protection program.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

More than 25 people out of nearly a hundred in attendance took the mike at a town hall meeting about Dayton’s drinking water protections Monday evening.

Satellite view of toxic algal bloom on Lake Erie
NASA Earth Observatory

Ohio lawmakers are preparing to go back to work and take on more pieces of legislation before the year ends. One of those issues includes improving water quality.

While speaking at a post-election conference, Republican Representative Dave Hall of Millersburg says that he doesn’t want to waste any time. The agriculture and natural resources committee he chairs will hold hearings next week on a bill that tackles many different issues including toxic algae problems.

Rising Sea Levels

Oct 30, 2014
go_greener_oz / Flickr Creative Commons

Should we be thinking about reserving spots for our great-grandchildren on glass-bottom boat tours of New Orleans and Manhattan? How much could sea-levels rise, and when? Could it reach Ohio? University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha takes a look at the extreme possibilities of sea-level rise in the future.

An artist's rendering of the new kayak run plan along the Great Miami River in downtown Dayton.
Five Rivers Metroparks

Five Rivers Metroparks has announced changes to the plan for a downtown Dayton kayaking run, which means a delayed timeline for the Riverscape River Run.

Dayton's wellfields supply water for an estimated 400,000 people in the area.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

 A new group called the Dayton Citizens’ Water Brigade is holding a teach-in tonight about the City of Dayton’s water protection policy.

The group opposes changes to the policy that’s been in place for over 25 years. The policy was created as an attempt to keep hazardous chemicals away from the wellfields that supply water to 400,000 people around Dayton, including most Montgomery County suburbs. It forbids new chemicals within a set geographic area, and provides incentives for companies to reduce chemical storage already in place through a buy-back program.

Wayne Baker / WYSO

 

The group People for Safe Water held a rally at the Clark County Combined Health District on Tuesday, voicing concerns over the Environmental Protection Agency's cleanup plan for the Tremont City Barrel Fill site by chanting "dig it up, truck it out."

The EPA's plan is to dig up barrels at the Tremont City landfill, remove the ones with liquid waste, but put the barrels filled with solid waste back in the ground.

The last part of that plan, putting barrels back in the ground, is what Clark County residents and city officials turned out to protest.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The City of Dayton water department says it’s considering feedback from the public and businesses on a proposal to change the city’s drinking water protections.

The city’s water system, which serves 400,000 people including customers in Kettering, Vandalia, Riverside, Trotwood and Brookville, pumps water from two industrial parts of Dayton. Since the late 80s, city zoning laws have limited the hazardous chemicals companies can have in those areas.

Collin O'Mara, President of the National Wildlife Federation, held up a glass of algae-filled water from Lake Erie after the toxins produced by the algae shut down Toledo's water system.
National Wildlife Federation Staff

Nothing brings consensus like a crisis. During Toledo’s recent drinking-water ban, conflicting ideas about how to test for toxins caused confusion for decision-makers, and hat problem sparked rare, swift action by multiple layers of government to create a uniform, statewide protocol.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton’s Mad River wellfield is on a grassy island in the middle of one of the city’s three major rivers. Phil Van Atta, head of Dayton’s water treatment operation, says the wellfield, where Dayton pumps up groundwater from the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, is one of his favorite places. The shallow sand and gravel aquifer in some places lies just feet below the ground, and its 1.5 trillion gallons of freshwater is constantly recharging from the rivers and rainfall.

Lake Erie Algae Threatens Ohio Drinking Water

Jul 20, 2014

This year the amount of harmful algae forecast for Lake Erie is predicted to be less than last year and considerably less than the record outbreak of 2011. But it’s likely still be significant, coating some parts of the western basin in toxic green slime. Under certain conditions, even moderate blooms can produce levels of harmful toxins that threaten drinking water across the basin.

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