Water

The Dayton City Commission has updated the city's water ordinance.
Wikipedia

The Dayton City Commission has passed a controversial set of changes to the city’s source water protection program.

 

The current code regulates the chemicals around Dayton’s well fields, where most of Montgomery County’s drinking water comes from. Since the late 80s, the zoning code has legislated the amount of potentially hazardous substances that can be stored near the wells. A related regulation, which will remain in place, provides incentives for companies that had chemicals grandfathered in to reduce those chemicals.

 

Darryl Fairchild (center) appeared at a demonstration outside city hall Wednesday. He is also a candidate for City Commission. water
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Activists are gearing up for another round of debate over the city of Dayton’s source water protection policy.

After more than a year of discussion, a compromise plan will go before the Dayton City Commission next week that would update the policy, which dates back to the late 1980s.

Marie Geisel joined the Dayton Citizens Water Brigade on Tuesday before a packed plan board meeting.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The debate over Dayton’s source water protection policy is still simmering, although the issues have changed somewhat since the idea of an update to the policy was first floated last summer.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has finished a one-year study of the Great Miami River Corridor, which looked at opportunities for economic development along a 99-mile stretch. The area studied runs from around Sidney, up in Shelby County, down to the city of Hamilton in Butler County.

Kevin Jones with the Fair River Oaks Priority Board spoke in front of nearly 100 people at a public town hall meeting on Dayton's source water protection program.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

More than 25 people out of nearly a hundred in attendance took the mike at a town hall meeting about Dayton’s drinking water protections Monday evening.

Satellite view of toxic algal bloom on Lake Erie
NASA Earth Observatory

Ohio lawmakers are preparing to go back to work and take on more pieces of legislation before the year ends. One of those issues includes improving water quality.

While speaking at a post-election conference, Republican Representative Dave Hall of Millersburg says that he doesn’t want to waste any time. The agriculture and natural resources committee he chairs will hold hearings next week on a bill that tackles many different issues including toxic algae problems.

Rising Sea Levels

Oct 30, 2014
go_greener_oz / Flickr Creative Commons

Should we be thinking about reserving spots for our great-grandchildren on glass-bottom boat tours of New Orleans and Manhattan? How much could sea-levels rise, and when? Could it reach Ohio? University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha takes a look at the extreme possibilities of sea-level rise in the future.

An artist's rendering of the new kayak run plan along the Great Miami River in downtown Dayton.
Five Rivers Metroparks

Five Rivers Metroparks has announced changes to the plan for a downtown Dayton kayaking run, which means a delayed timeline for the Riverscape River Run.

Signs around the Miami Valley demarcate the boundaries of the well fields and source water protection areas.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

 A new group called the Dayton Citizens’ Water Brigade is holding a teach-in tonight about the City of Dayton’s water protection policy.

The group opposes changes to the policy that’s been in place for over 25 years. The policy was created as an attempt to keep hazardous chemicals away from the wellfields that supply water to 400,000 people around Dayton, including most Montgomery County suburbs. It forbids new chemicals within a set geographic area, and provides incentives for companies to reduce chemical storage already in place through a buy-back program.

Wayne Baker / WYSO

 

The group People for Safe Water held a rally at the Clark County Combined Health District on Tuesday, voicing concerns over the Environmental Protection Agency's cleanup plan for the Tremont City Barrel Fill site by chanting "dig it up, truck it out."

The EPA's plan is to dig up barrels at the Tremont City landfill, remove the ones with liquid waste, but put the barrels filled with solid waste back in the ground.

The last part of that plan, putting barrels back in the ground, is what Clark County residents and city officials turned out to protest.

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