A recent survey conducted by MadeInDaytonBlog.Com indicates that many manufacturing jobs in the Dayton area remain unfilled, despite large numbers of people looking for work.

The blog was started back in December as a clearinghouse for local manufacturers to communicate needs and exchange ideas.  More than a hundred companies responded to the survey and said they have jobs that have remained unfilled – and many say the disconnect between available jobs and the unemployed comes down to skills. 

DAYTON- Ohio’s unemployment rate continues to drop, indicating economic improvement in the state. Figures from the United States Bureau of Labor statistics show that the state has seen an overall 1 percent decrease in jobless Ohioans from September to February.  However, local rates in the Dayton Metropolitan area are still high. 

Dayton’s jobless rate in October was at 9.3 then fell to 8.3 percent in November.  It has been rising since then and now stands at 8.8 percent for January.  Figures for February and March are not yet released for the City.

Ohio's welfare rolls have seen an 18 percent drop over the past year, largely due to recipients booted from the program for failing to work or get job training.

The Columbus Dispatch reports Monday that 36 percent of the drop is attributed to failure to meet work requirements. Other reasons include paperwork errors, income increases or time limits.

Ohio's unemployment rate has dropped again, following the biggest one-month decline in almost 30 years.

The state Department of Job and Family Services reported Friday that the state had joblessness of 8.1 percent in December, down from 8.5 percent in November.  The November rate had been down a full half-point from October's even 9 percent.

Gov. John Kasich says Ohio is seeing a record drop in the numbers of people who are unemployed. But Ohio Public Radio’s Karen Kasler reports one economist is saying the story behind those numbers isn’t anything to celebrate.

Ohio's unemployment rate has dropped by a half a percentage point, to 8.5 percent in November from an even 9 percent in October.

The state's Department of Job and Family Services says 30,000 fewer people were unemployed in Ohio last month. The number of jobless workers has gone down by 69,000 in the past 12 months.

Ohio payrolls outside of farms grew by 6,000 in November, led by hiring in services. Manufacturing jobs increased, but those gains were offset by losses in construction.

Thousands of jobless Ohioans are in danger of running out of their unemployment benefits early next year, if Congress doesn't renew a federal extension of benefits. Ben Johnson is with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services.

"70,000 people will exhaust their unemployment compensation in January, another 36, 000, almost 37,000 in February, about 58,000 in March and more than 10,000 between March and June but the numbers are smaller," says Johnson.

Hundreds of people who lost jobs when freezing weather hit California in January 2007 line up to register for the Disaster Unemployment Assistance program funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

1857, the 1870s, the 1890s, 1907, 1914, 1919, 1921: The United States faced widespread joblessness in all of these years, well before the Great Depression, not to mention today's Great Recession. As legislators in Washington prepare to debate another round of stimulus spending, and as unemployment reaches record highs, historian Daniel Amsterdam looks back at how the United States has tackled major spikes in unemployment throughout its history and how American efforts have compared with those of other countries.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - It appears Ohio won't get $176 million in federal stimulus money to expand its unemployment benefits.

The federal government set aside $7 billion to give to states that expanded those benefits, and the deadline is Monday. Ohio's General Assembly would have to pass a law to make those changes, but no voting session was scheduled Monday.

A spokesman for Republican Gov. John Kasich says it's unwise to make changes that will cost the state in the long run in exchange for one-time money from the federal government.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Hundreds of home-weatherization jobs are expected to be lost in Ohio as federal stimulus money runs out for programs that help low-income and elderly Ohioans with home-energy improvements.

The Ohio Association of Community Action Agencies in Columbus told the state this week that agencies providing services for the Home Weatherization Assistance Program expect to lay off about 700 employees in the next six months.