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Traffic Cameras

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
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The Dayton chapter of the NAACP has launched an effort to remove the City of Dayton's recently reactivated traffic cameras.

Group members allege the cameras unfairly target vulnerable communities in the Miami Valley.

The organization is aiming to collect 5,000 signatures on a petition to put the issue on the November ballot.

NAACP President Derrick Foward says the cameras disproportionately affect poor residents.

traffic camera red light camera
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The City of Dayton is activating traffic cameras at two more sites Monday. A total of five intersections within city limits are now camera monitored.

Red-light cameras have officially been activated at the intersections of James H. McGee Blvd and Third Street and Linden Avenue and Smithville Rd. Violators will be issued warnings for the first 30 days after activation. After that, $85 citations will be issued by mail.

Speed cameras are already operating at three other city intersections:

traffic camera red light camera
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An Ohio village ordered to pay back $3 million in citations stemming from automated traffic cameras is taking its case to the state Supreme Court.

 The Hamilton-Middletown Journal News reports New Miami has asked the Ohio Supreme Court to hear its appeal. Lower courts have ruled that New Miami isn't immune to legal action because it gained funds by collecting fines under a traffic camera program that was declared unconstitutional in 2014.

The village argues sovereign immunity is guaranteed to municipalities across the state and necessary for preserving "fiscal integrity."

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Traffic cameras will officially be activated in Dayton next month, according to a press release issued by the city.

Red light and speed cameras at 5 major intersections could be turned on as early as Sunday, October 1. Cameras will be located on: 

 

James H. McGee Blvd. at Third St.

N. Main St. at Siebenthaler Ave. 

N. Gettysburg Ave at Fairbanks Ave.

Linden Ave at  Smithville Rd. 

S. Keowee St. between Third St. and Fifth St.  

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The Ohio Supreme Court has again upheld cities' use of traffic camera enforcement, striking down as unconstitutional legislative restrictions that included requiring a police officer to be present.

The justices voted 5-2 in a ruling Wednesday.

 The city of Dayton had challenged a state law that took effect in 2015, saying it improperly limited local control and undercut camera enforcement that has made cities safer. Dayton and other cities said the law's restrictions that also required a three-year traffic study made traffic cameras cost-prohibitive.

Court Rules Against Dayton Traffic Cameras

Aug 10, 2015
traffic camera red light camera
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Ohio’s 2nd District Court of Appeals has ruled against Dayton’s efforts to continue use of its traffic camera program.

 

City officials sued the state after lawmakers banned the cameras earlier this year. In March, the state created a law saying cities could only use the cameras to ticket drivers if a police officer was on site.

 

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city of Dayton will continue to use its traffic cameras, but will now only make citations when an officer is present. It’s part of an ongoing face-off with the state over the use of the speed and red light cameras.

In March, the state of Ohio created a law banning the use of traffic cameras to ticket drivers, unless a police officer was on site.  

Several cities, including Dayton filed lawsuits against the state, saying the law violated "home rule" authority.

traffic camera red light camera
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One provision that’s likely to stay in the final version of the state budget being worked on now is a proposal to deduct state money from cities still using traffic cameras. Officials in those affected cities are frustrated by the move. 

Traffic cameras are a topic that revs up contentious debate for Republicans and Democrats.  But last year, camera opponents prevailed and this March, a law took effect requiring cities to station police officers with cameras to observe violations. Cities say those cameras are important safety tools, and they sued.

Ohio County Judge Blocks New State Rules On Traffic Cameras

Apr 3, 2015
traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

A southwest Ohio judge has ruled new restrictions on traffic cameras violate the state's constitution, granting the city of Dayton a permanent order blocking them.

Montgomery County Common Pleas Judge Barbara Gorman says rules like requiring police officers to be present when cameras are used violate the Ohio municipalities' "home rule" powers. She says the law passed late last year tells local governments how to allocate their law enforcement personnel.

75 mph Speed Limit Proposal On Chopping Block In Ohio

Mar 24, 2015

A proposal to boost Ohio's speed limit to 75 mph on rural interstate highways and the turnpike has been scrapped.

House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger's office said the proposed increase would be pulled from a $7 billion, two-year transportation budget.

The proposal would have made Ohio only the second state entirely east of the Mississippi River to have such a high limit. The other is Maine. A total of 16 states, mostly out West, have at least a 75 mph speed limit.

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