Southwest Ohio Planned Parenthood

A bill that seeks to divert more than $1 million in government funding away from Planned Parenthood has cleared the Ohio House.

Backers say the proposal targets grants Planned Parenthood receives through Ohio's health department. The public dollars - mostly federal money - support initiatives including HIV testing, breast and cervical cancer screenings and prevention of violence against women.

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

A federal judge has ruled the last two abortion clinics in southwest Ohio can remain open while fighting to keep their state operating licenses.

Court documents show a federal judge in Cincinnati issued the preliminary injunction Tuesday. The clinics sought the ruling in their lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of abortion restrictions approved in the two most recent state budgets.

A NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio statement says those restrictions are medically unnecessary.

House Republicans in Ohio are pursuing a proposal that targets abortion providers like Planned Parenthood while directing public health care dollars to other programs that help uninsured and underinsured women.

To avoid constitutional issues, lawmakers placed Planned Parenthood at the back of the line for money rather than defunding it entirely.

DAYTON, OH - An incomplete application for federal funding means clients of an Ohio Planned Parenthood chapter will now pay for services that were free.

The Dayton Daily News reports the error will cost Planned Parenthood Southwest Ohio Region more than $5 million dollars over the next five years.

The funding loss is expected to primarily affect low-income clients in four counties. They made up nearly 45 percent of Planned Parenthood visitors in 2010.

The Cincinnati-based chapter does not plan any layoffs and hopes to make up the shortfall with private fund raising.