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Opioid Epidemic

Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County

Unintentional drug overdose deaths in Montgomery County for 2017 now stand at 499. The numbers were released during a monthly update from Public Health Dayton & Montgomery County, and Montgomery County Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) on Thursday.

In September there were 33 accidental drug overdoses logged by the county. Those deaths have been trending downward since a spike in May when there were 80 deaths recorded.

State officials have enacted new regulations to curb what they say is overprescribing of opioid painkiller medications to patients who may not really need them
Chaos

Ohio’s opioid crisis continues to escalate. In an effort to curb the epidemic, the state is launching a new program designed to help spot criminal activity and prescription drug abuse.

 

Since 2006, Ohio has been collecting information on all prescriptions for controlled substances, including those prescribed by doctors and those dispensed by pharmacies. The data is tracked in the so-called Automated Rx Reporting System, also known as OARRS.

Ohio Department of Health numbers show in 2015, roughly six babies a day were admitted to Ohio hospitals for NAS.
Wikimedia Commons / WYSO

The state's first treatment center for drug-exposed babies is set to open next month in Kettering. Brigid’s Path aims to provide inpatient medical care for newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome, also known as NAS.

 

Organizers say Brigid’s Path was created in response to the opioid crisis in Dayton.

Emily Surico, program manager for drug and crime prevention at East End Community Services, says the clinic will provide the kind of specialty care that many hospitals aren’t necessarily equipped for.

 

The Cincinnati Enquirer sent reporters into the field for seven days to report on the heroin crisis. They returned with an alarming snapshot of a national epidemic.

Sandra Lamb is the second person to graduate from the U-Turn Recovery Court. The first is David Key. Judge John Rudduck stands between the two in this photo.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Overdose deaths continue to rise in Southwest Ohio, and the opioid epidemic is taking a toll on courts as more and more addicts end up behind bars for drug-related crimes. To help mitigate overcrowding, some Miami Valley counties are launching special drug courts. The courts offer nonviolent addicts a chance to avoid jail and get the services they need to stay clean and out of trouble for good—but it’s no easy fix.

Sandy

State officials have enacted new regulations to curb what they say is overprescribing of opioid painkiller medications to patients who may not really need them
Chaos

Beginning this week, Ohio, doctors, dentists and nurses will be required to follow new rules for prescribing opioid medications.

The rules include limits to opioid prescriptions for conditions such as broken bones, sprains and minor surgery to seven days for adults and five days for minors.

The changes are similar to those already enacted in a handful of other states, including Rhode Island, Virginia and New Jersey.

State officials have enacted new regulations to curb what they say is overprescribing of opioid painkiller medications to patients who may not really need them
Chaos

Montgomery County mental health officials say the Medicaid cuts proposed in the Senate bill to replace the Affordable Care Act, The Better Care Reconciliation Act, could reduce the county’s ability to deliver addiction treatment services. Montgomery County has one of the highest rates of drug-overdose deaths per capita in the United States.

Pic from right: Gail Dafler, prevention specialist Goodwill Easter Seals Miami Valley (GWESMV); Dawn Cooksey, director of Behavioral Health Services GWESMV;   Helen Jones-Kelley, executive director, Montgomery County Alcohol, Drug Addiction & Mental Healt
ADAMHS

Officials with Montgomery County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) say around 75 percent of people addicted to opioids first became hooked through a doctor’s prescription.

 

That high percentage prompted ADAMHS, Kroger pharmacies and Goodwill Easter Seals to collaborate on a new effort to distribute free drug-disposal bags.

 

Officials say the bags offer a safe, cost-effective and environmentally responsible solution to eliminate unwanted opioid prescription drugs.

The mayor says the city's education initiative is showing signs of early success in helping to prepare young people for higher education and entering the workforce.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Less than a week after Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine announced the state is suing five pharmaceutical companies for their role in the opioid epidemic, the city of Dayton is bringing its own suit. Mayor Nan Whaley Monday announced the lawsuit, which she says is needed to recover costs associated with police, fire, EMS and addiction treatment services.

Bureau of Criminal Investigation lab Springfield clark county court drug evidence police sheriff jail fentnyl heroin opioids
WYSO/Jess Mador

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, along with officials from Clark County and the city of Springfield, Tuesday unveiled a new Bureau of Criminal Investigation lab in downtown Springfield.

The lab will be dedicated to testing drug evidence seized by law enforcement agencies in Clark County and statewide. Officials say it will be staffed by two highly trained and experienced drug-chemistry scientists, who will test complex combinations of drugs, including heroin, fentanyl, and other synthetic street opioids.

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