Ohio Constitution

Lawmaker Term Limit Extension Could Be Back On The Table

Jul 13, 2015
Lawmakers scrapped Gov. Kasich's proposal that would have given schools less money.
User: Thoth188 / Flickr/Creative Commons

Two proposals to extend term limits are expected to take the next steps toward the ballot next year.

The panel making recommendations for possible changes to the Ohio Constitution is expected to take up the two recommendations this fall that would lengthen lawmakers’ term limits from eight years to 12.

The issue has garnered major pushback from the federal group known simply as U.S. Term Limits, and the conservative-leaning American Policy Roundtable.

As lawmakers talk about changing the process by which groups with economic interests in changing the constitution can bring amendments to voters, one of those groups is planning another amendment that hits back at those legislators.

The ResponsibleOhio amendment would legalize marijuana in Ohio and specify ten growing sites. Senate President Keith Faber and House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger, both Republicans, say they want to make it harder for groups to put before voters amendments which have a benefit for them.

State Auditor Dave Yost announced results of a charter school attendance audit Thursday.
ohio.gov

The proposed constitutional amendment that would legalize and regulate marijuana in Ohio has one state official calling for an overhaul of the process.

Auditor David Yost says he thinks it’s too easy for private economic interests to get constitutional amendments onto the state ballot. 

“The whole initiative process was designed to protect the many against the powerful few,” said Yost. “What’s happening now is that the powerful few are using that very safeguard to get their own way and make themselves rich at the expense of the many.” 

For the fifth time in 100 years, Ohioans have rejected the chance to revisit Ohio's Constitution.

Such a forum would have allowed debate on issues such as redistricting, term limits, casino gambling and gay marriage. Instead, voters rejected Issue 1 in Tuesday's election by strong margins in every county.

Under state law, the question of calling a constitutional convention must be presented to voters every 20 years. Voters in an era of renewed interest in constitutional issues were thought to perhaps have more interest in a gathering to revise the founding document.