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Two recent protests over the police killing of John Crawford III were the first ones to lead to arrests. walmart protest
Wayne Baker / WYSO

New information has come to light about the fatal police shooting of John Crawford III, a black man who was killed by white police officer Sean Williams inside a Beavercreek Walmart store in 2014.

 

In deposition documents related to a federal wrongful-death lawsuit, Officer Sean Williams said he did not see Crawford point a gun at anyone at the Walmart store. 

 

The police officer said he shot 22-year-old Crawford because he felt Crawford was “about to” aim a rifle at him and Williams felt an imminent threat.

Dayton Public Schools
Liam Niemeyer / WYSO

Dayton officials are seeking public comments on a plan to close or consolidate Dayton Public School-district facilities.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, members of the Dayton City Commission and DPS officials Thursday launched a new 16-member task force that will work to identify underutilized administration buildings and schools for potential shutdown after the current school year.

Stepping Into The Kitchen With Chef Elizabeth Wiley

Jan 4, 2018
Chef Elizabeth Wiley is the owner of Meadowlark Restaurant and Wheat Penny Oven and Bar.
George Drake Jr. / WYSO

Owner of the Meadowlark Restaurant in Kettering and Wheat Penny Oven and Bar in Dayton, Chef Elizabeth Wiley, has been a player in the area’s restaurant scene on-and-off for almost 40 years. Over that time, she’s made more of a name for herself nationally, and watched other local female chefs climb the ladder alongside her. 

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Some Wright State University faculty members are speaking out about what they’re calling a “lack of progress” in ongoing contract talks with the university. The negotiations have already lasted nearly a year.

The Wright State faculty union late last year amended its bylaws to allow a strike vote if necessary.

Union spokesperson Noeleen McIlvenna says, during negotiation sessions, the university has not been specific about what issues are on the table.

Freezing temperatures are expected to continue throughout the week, and the city of Dayton has opened several city recreational facilities as warming centers for residents who need a place to escape the cold.

Officials say the warming centers will remain open during regular business hours through Friday, Jan. 5.

 

Those centers are:  

 

* Greater Dayton Recreation Center, 2021 W. Third St.

Greater Dayton RTA
Greater Dayton RTA / Greater Dayton RTA

On Tuesday, Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority board members approved a number of route changes and a rate increase for riders.

 

Under the plan, single-boarding fares will increase from $1.75 to $2, and tokens worth $1.50 will be eliminated. Several current routes will also be eliminated under the plan.

 

Dayton RTA officials say the changes were needed following a change in Medicare managed-care payments last year.

 

A Pennsylvania gas well.  fracking drilling
Gerry Dincher / Flickr/Creative Commons

The Trump administration decided quietly over the holidays to abandon proposed federal regulations governing fracking on public lands. For Ohio environmentalists, the decision is big and bad news. For Ohio’s oil and gas industry, it’s a practical approach to regulation. 

Premier Health provider, Miami Valley Hospital
WYSO/Joshua Chenault

UnitedHealthcare and Premier Health have reached a contract agreement. The deal restores in-network access to Premier doctors and facilities for nearly 200,000 UnitedHealthcare policyholders.

Last spring, contract talks between Dayton-based Premier and Minnesota-based insurance giant UnitedHealth Group broke down. The impasse left at least 60,000 Premier Health patients out of network with their doctors.

A temporary special discounted flat fee offered by Premier last year to help patients maintain their medical care expired December 31, 2017.

In Ohio, state lawmakers and voting advocates are working on perhaps-competing plans to revamp Congressional redistricting. But ours is not the only state struggling with how political maps are drawn. A Wisconsin case is before the U.S. Supreme Court. A voter initiative is underway in Michigan. Lawmakers are debating change in Pennsylvania. And California has replaced politicians with a citizen commission. In the final installment of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze looks at the efforts here and elsewhere.

Ohio voters may see not one, but two, issues next year overhauling the way congressional districts are drawn. In the words of one advocate: “I care about slaying the gerrymander because I’m an American.”

Here is the fourth installment of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines."

On election night two years ago, Catherine Turcer of Common Cause Ohio couldn’t have been more thrilled.

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