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Stats + Stories: Are Communities Helped By Terraforming Food Deserts?

May 13, 2018
Bonnie Ghosh-Dastidar is a senior statistician and Director of the Statistics Advisory Center at RAND Corporation.	Her current research interests center on leveraging natural experiment designs to estimate the effects of neighborhood-level 'interventions'
via Stats + Stories

WYSO is partnering with Stats and Stories, a podcast produced at Miami University.

The Rand Corporation is a global think-tank which launched in 1948. The original purpose of providing analysis to the U.S. Military, and now conducts research and analysis for governments, universities and other organizations from all over the world. Rand's policy interests include children and families, national security, and health and health care among many other issues. Rand's health related research is the focus of this episode of Stats & Stories. Host Rosemary Pennington and regular panelists are Department of Statistics' Chair John Bailer and Department of Media, Journalism and Film's Chair, Richard Campbell are joined by guest Bonnie Ghosh-Dastidar. She's a Senior Statistician and Director of the Statistical Advisory Center at Rand. Ghosh-Dastidar's work has examined issues related to HIV, as well as Population Health and recent research has examined how neighborhood-level changes in health behaviors impacts health outcomes.

The story of Wilbur and Orville Wright has been told countless times. Two completely self-taught, self-funded brothers invent the airplane in the back of their West Dayton bike shop. The world was never the same. But the story of the Wright brothers’ background is even more unorthodox than it seems. In the late 1800s, during the heart of the Victorian Era, the Wright brothers’ mother inspired their mechanical aptitude. Community Voices producer Leo DeLuca has a story about Susan Catherine Koerner Wright.

 

Small portraits of Deb Goode Jarison's parents hang on a wall of the small office in her Yellow Springs home, where much of the work she performs as founder of EECAP takes place.
Andy Jerison

Recently, Dayton History opened to the public their latest historical exhibit detailing the history of operations at the Mound Nuclear Facility in Miamisburg. The Cold War Discovery Center highlights the work conducted at Mound Laboratories. By all accounts, it was important work. It was top-secret, and it was dangerous for the workers - many of whom were exposed to radiation and other toxic elements used at the site.

During Antioch College's 2017 Reunion, alumni visited the WYSO studios and shared their stories with current Antioch students and WYSO staff members.  This edition of the Antioch Word features alumna Mackenzie Bristow, class of 2001. Current Antioch student Chris Welter talks with Mackenzie about the importance of SOPP, which has been recently featured in The New York Times, and how student activism is key to building community.

Susan Wright: The Mother Of Flight

May 11, 2018
Susan Catherine Koerner Wright
Carillon Historical Park

The story of Wilbur and Orville Wright has been told countless times. Two completely self-taught, self-funded brothers invent the airplane in the back of their West Dayton bike shop. The world was never the same. But the story of the Wright brothers’ background is even more unorthodox than it seems. In the late 1800s, during the heart of the Victorian Era, the Wright brothers’ mother inspired their mechanical aptitude. Community Voices producer Leo DeLuca has a story about Susan Catherine Koerner Wright.

WYSO is a partner in the Southwest Ohio Your Voice Ohio project. It's a collaborative effort to produce more relevant, powerful journalism based on the needs and ambitions of Ohioans and Ohio communities.
Your Voice Ohio

Give Ohioans time to listen to one another and they are capable of developing a plan to turn around the addiction crisis. So why isn’t it happening?

Journalists from the Your Voice Ohio media collaborative of nearly 40 print, radio, television and web news outlets met with several hundred people across the state from late 2017 well into 2018. The journalists were with the people, at the table, listening and sharing different perspectives on the crisis killing 4,000 in the state annually.

Miriam Mushtalova
Basim Blunt / WYSO

There's a large Turkish refugee community in Dayton, some were exiled from Russia several years ago. For today's Dayton Youth Radio producer, balancing the old traditions with the new is doable. Until one family, a big one, showed up for tea.

My name is Miriam. I am 17 years old. I go to Stivers School for the Arts. I was born in Russia, raised in the US. Many immigrant families know how difficult it is to grow up in America.

Evenflo is one of Miamisburg's largest employers.
City of Miamisburg Municipal Government Facebook page

Baby-product company Evenflo has announced dozens of jobs will be leaving Miamisburg. The changes were announced earlier in the week as part of Evenflo’s parent company Goodbaby North America’s  corporate restructuring.

Under the plan, the company’s headquarters will relocate to Boston and eliminate roughly 60 jobs in Miamisburg within the next year.

Officials say the move will begin in the summer of 2018 and is expected to be completed by the first quarter of 2019.

Antioch University Midwest
Jerry Kenney

Antioch University is moving ahead with the sale of their Yellow Springs campus. The Yellow Springs News reports the university has marketed the building with a national real-estate firm.

News of the potential sale was first announced in 2016. Officials told WYSO they're looking for a smaller space in a more centrally located area, such as Dayton, nearer to more potential future students.

Senior Voices: Millie Lyons

May 9, 2018
Millie Lyons
Senior Voices

Millie Lyons was just a year old when her dad died in 1923. Her mom was left with five young  children. There was no social security system back then, and Millie’s mom needed to work to support the family. Millie says her earliest memory is being in a crib at the Pythian Children’s Home in Springfield. It was a tough start, but she and her siblings found plenty of ways to have fun, as she told Community Voices interviewer Alan Staiger.

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