WYSO

Montgomery County Alcohol Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services

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Accidental drug overdose deaths have decreased in Montgomery County over the past few months, according to a new report from the Community Overdose Action Team task force. But, that doesn’t necessarily mean fewer people are grappling with drug addiction, officials say.

The number of Montgomery County overdose deaths fell by more than half between May and August of this year, from 80 to 38 per month.  

State officials have enacted new regulations to curb what they say is overprescribing of opioid painkiller medications to patients who may not really need them
Chaos / WYSO

Montgomery County mental health officials say the Medicaid cuts proposed in the Senate bill to replace the Affordable Care Act, The Better Care Reconciliation Act, could reduce the county’s ability to deliver addiction treatment services. Montgomery County has one of the highest rates of drug-overdose deaths per capita in the United States.

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Two local health agencies are expanding their services for people dealing with serious addiction to heroin and other opiates.

 

 

Montgomery County Commissioners have approved more than $3.5 million dollars in new funding to Montgomery County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) and Public Health – Dayton & Montgomery County.

 

The mass shooting in Orlando over the weekend has re-ignited debates on gun control, LGBT rights, and terrorism. It has also raised mental health concerns as people around the country cope with the news.

Jodi Long, the director for behavioral treatment and supportive services in Montgomery County (ADAMHS)  says that psychological trauma can extend beyond Orlando.

April Laissle

Montgomery County has the second highest heroin overdose rate in the state of Ohio. It’s a problem that has left commissioners from the City of Dayton and Montgomery County desperate for answers.

 

At a crowded joint meeting held to discuss the epidemic, representatives from area health organizations explained the hard facts of the issue, and why tackling it has become so complex.

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Dayton officials say in spite of efforts to lower the rate of accidental drug overdose deaths in the Miami Valley, the numbers are still climbing.

In Montgomery County, unintentional drug overdose deaths increased 63 percent from just two years ago—from 226 deaths in 2013 to 264 in 2014.  Heroin overdoses climbed 226 percent from 2010 to 2014.