Minimum Wage

Ohio Group Pursues Minimum Wage Ballot Issue

Nov 6, 2015
Minimum wage activists demonstrated in Dayton in December 2013.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A group backed by unions and faith-based organizations wants to ask voters to raise the minimum wage over the next few years. The Ohio Organizing Collaborative wants the minimum wage in Ohio to go up to $10 per hour in 2017 and scale up to $12 per hour by 2021.

Director Kirk Noden says that their polling shows widespread support for a higher minimum wage.

“Ohioans are a cautious, pragmatic electorate, but I think if you were to put $10 per hour on the ballot, that polls at more than 70 percent," Noden says. "People who would pass that easily.”

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A ballot effort to boost Ohio's minimum wage has cleared an initial hurdle.


Attorney General Mike DeWine certified a petition for the proposed constitutional amendment Friday, saying it had the necessary signatures and a "fair and truthful" summary.


The proposal seeks to increase the minimum wage for non-tipped workers to $10 an hour on Jan. 1, 2017. That amount would then increase in 50-cent increments each year until it reaches $12 an hour in 2021.



Two commission-based sales reps are asking the Ohio Supreme Court to decide whether a constitutional amendment okayed by voters in 2006 required that they be paid minimum wage. The eventual ruling could have a big impact on businesses and employees throughout Ohio.

The lawsuit started with one of those free coupon magazines that come in the mail or in a plastic bag delivered to your doorstep. For this particular coupon book, JB Dollar Stretcher, most of the hundred or so employees of the company were outside sales representatives who were paid on commission.

The Kmart store in Springfield has closed. As a result of the store's closure, 68 jobs will be lost.
Wayne Baker / WYSO

The state of Ohio released local job and unemployment numbers Tuesday, and the news is looking good for Dayton and the state. In December 2014, the statewide unemployment rate dipped to a seasonally adjusted 4.8 percent, the lowest it’s been since 2001. The greater Dayton area was down to 4.5 percent, almost two percentage points lower than it was at the end of 2013.

Clarence Stewart works at a Walmart in Cincinnati. He says he was kicked out of the Dayton Walmart for talking to customers about the strike.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Walmart staff blocked the doors Thursday as protesters attempted to enter the Butler Township store with fliers for their Black Friday demonstration.

Around 60 people gathered in the cold outside the Walmart off Miller Lane, demanding Walmart raise wages to $15 an hour. The event started out as your standard protest, with speeches, chants and signs. Willis Blackshear is the Montgomery County recorder.

Minimum wage activists demonstrated in Dayton in December 2013.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Today is October 10, 10/10—and it’s been declared National Minimum Wage Day. $10.10 is the new minimum wage many advocates are calling for. Right now Ohio’s minimum wage is $7.95, and it will automatically go up to $8.10 on January 1, 2015.

Workers march to deliver "strike papers" to Walmart officials. Nov 2013
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

A protest is coming to the Dayton Walmart on York Commons Wednesday as part of a week of protests and employee walkouts at Walmart stores around the country. Walmart workers and supporters of a living wage increase by the retail giant will be joined by State Rep. Connie Pillich (D-28). She believes an across-the-board wage boost would help struggling families.

“We’re talking about a living wage,” says Pillich. “We’re making sure that people at Walmart and other places in Ohio, can earn enough money and get enough work hours to support their families.”

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Chipotle is hiring around the Dayton area—a job fair Thursday in Beavercreek advertised 300 positions coming open this year, and there were 27 postings on the company's site Thursday.

Minimum Wage Goes Up in 2014

Dec 31, 2013

Hundreds of thousands of Ohioans are getting a raise starting in the New Year. The state’s minimum wage will go up ten cents from $7.85 an hour to $7.95 an hour. The automatic boost comes from a policy known as indexing, which Ohio has adopted along with 11 other states. Indexing raises the minimum wage to account for increases to the cost of living.

Jack Temple, a policy analyst for the National Employment Law Project, says the extra ten cents an hour can go a long way.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Protests demanding a raise in the minimum wage have been spreading across the country, and the movement made its way to Dayton for the first time. On Thursday, union-backed groups reported events in over 100 cities; some involved worker walk-outs, but many were protests or demonstrations in front of fast food and retail outlets.

Outside the McDonald’s in downtown Dayton around lunchtime, a small crowd gathered near the road, rallying drivers to honk in support. The protesters’ complaint: Ohio’s minimum wage of $7.85 isn’t enough to actually live on.