medical marijuana
David Twain / Flickr Creative Commons

A proposed rule would let Ohio attorneys counsel clients seeking to comply with the state's new medical marijuana law.

The Ohio Supreme Court released a proposed amendment to its professional conduct rules on Wednesday.

If adopted, it would let attorneys help clients navigate the law and how it's implemented. The proposal says lawyers also should advise clients regarding related federal law.

On Monday, the Beavercreek city council passed a six-month ban on medical marijuana. The ordinance prohibits the city from granting any permits to grow, process, or sell marijuana until January. It doesn’t ban the use of medical marijuana at home.


ResponsibleOhio this week kicked off an RV tour of the state to promote its marijuana legalization initiative.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

The backers of last month’s marijuana legalization issue spent a lot of money on a campaign that voters overwhelmingly rejected. 

User: Coaster420 / Wikimedia/Creative Commons

A Democratic lawmaker who suffers from multiple sclerosis says Ohioans are growing impatient waiting for medical marijuana. Sen. Kenny Yuko says he wants to come up with a way to license and regulate medical marijuana, saying he feels it’s time for state lawmakers to stop joking about the medical marijuana proposals he repeatedly sponsors.

“Every time we mention medical marijuana, immediately people envision Cheech and Chong, George Carlin and the millions of times I’ve heard the jokes how many joint sponsors do you have for your legislation?”

Though Ohio voters soundly rejected a proposal to legalize marijuana, the group that brought it to the ballot says it’s pushing forward with its next proposal.

ResponsibleOhio has been working on what it calls the Fresh Start Act, which executive director Ian James said would allow for the elimination of records of non-violent marijuana convictions for offenses that will someday no longer be illegal.

Former Ohio Governor Bob Taft says he disagrees with his cousins on marijuana. But the disagreement is quite civil.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The marijuana initiative on Tuesday’s ballot in Ohio went down in flames, with 65 percent voting “no” on legalizing recreational and medical marijuana.

User: Coaster420 / Wikimedia/Creative Commons

Ohio voters have rejected a ballot measure seeking to legalize recreational and medical marijuana use in the state.

Failure of the proposed constitutional amendment follows an expensive campaign, a legal fight over its ballot wording and an investigation into the proposal's petition signatures.

The measure known as Issue 3 on Tuesday's ballot would have allowed adults 21 and older to use, purchase or grow certain amounts of marijuana. The constitutional amendment would have established a regulatory and taxation scheme while creating a network of 10 growing facilities.

warrantedarrest / Flick Creative Commons

In just under two weeks Ohioans will be voting on a pot legalization measure on the fall ballot. But on Thursday Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County and several other local agencies—law enforcement and mental health organizations—held a press conference to talk about what they say would be detrimental effects of recreational marijuana use for the area.

Jerry Kenney

A forum in Yellow Springs Thursday evening about marijuana legalization drew a vocal crowd of about 75. Participants asked panelists about Issue 3, which would amend the constitution to legalize marijuana possession and sales, and give growing rights to a limited number of landowners. Many questioners were pro-legalization.


Lewis Wallace / WYSO

 A referendum on the ballot this November could make Ohio the fifth state to legalize recreational and medical marijuana, following Washington, Oregon, Colorado and Alaska.