WYSO

John Crawford

World Police Vehicles / Flickr Creative Commons

The police officer who shot and killed John Crawford III at a Beavercreek Walmart nearly three years ago is back on full duty.

 

Calls seeking confirmation from the city of Beavercreek were not immediately returned Wednesday.

The Dayton Daily News reports Officer Sean Williams was assigned to administrative desk duty shortly after the August, 2014, shooting.

A Greene County Grand Jury declined to indict anyone involved in the case.

(from left) Bomani Moyenda with Justice for John Crawford in Yellow Springs and Black Lives Matter Miami Valley, Carlos Buford, with Urban Citizens for Social Justice, and Bishop Richard Cox from Justice for Racial Equality and Brotherhood
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

The Justice Department has announced it’s ending an investigation into the fatal shooting of John Crawford III, a black man who was killed by a white Beavercreek Police Officer  inside a Beavercreek Wal-Mart in 2014. A Crawford family attorney says the news comes as a major disappointment.

Federal authorities said they would not pursue civil rights charges in the case, citing insufficient evidence.

They said investigators analyzed store-surveillance video, interviewed witnesses and used an independent crime scene reconstruction expert in their review.

A photo of John Crawford III posted to his mother, Tressa Sherrod's Facebook page has been reproduced in art honoring him around the country.
Tressa Sherrod via Facebook

An attorney says the family of a black man fatally shot by a white police officer in a Beavercreek Wal-Mart is extremely disappointed that federal authorities have decided against charging the officer.

Officer Sean Williams shot 22-year-old John Crawford III in 2014 after a 911 call about someone waving a rifle in a store in Beavercreek. Police say he didn't obey commands to drop what they learned later was an air rifle he was carrying from a store shelf. Crawford’s family attorneys have said Crawford had less than a second to react to commands.

Tressa Sherrod via Facebook

An Ohio city has spent over $430,000 defending two officers in connection with the fatal police shooting of a man at a Wal-Mart who was carrying an air rifle from a store shelf.

The Dayton Daily News reports the cost to the Dayton suburb of Beavercreek includes about $210,000 paid to two law firms.

The city's law director says outside counsel was necessary. Crawford family attorney Michael Wright says the money could have gone toward a settlement for the family.

Tressa Sherrod via Facebook

More than 200 people gathered at a rally remembering a man fatally shot by police two years ago inside an Ohio Wal-Mart.

The event Saturday afternoon in Dayton honored John Crawford III, a black man from Fairfield.

A 911 caller had reported a man waving a gun at the Beavercreek store on Aug. 5, 2014. It was actually an air rifle from a shelf. Police say he refused to drop it.

The officer wasn't charged, in one of a series of cases around the nation raising concern about police encounters with black men.

Tressa Sherrod via Facebook

Attorneys for the family of John Crawford III have written a letter to the Justice Department asking them wrap up their investigation. 

They claim that while the DOJ’s investigation of Crawford’s death in a Beavercreek Walmart remains underway, the family is unable to move forward with a civil lawsuit against the city of Beavercreek and the police officers who shot Crawford in 2014.

They have asked the DOJ to complete their investigation by the end of August.

Kabbeh Davies, Antioch College '18

The group Justice for John Crawford says they’re disappointed with the decision by special prosecutor Mark Piepmeier to not pursue charges of making a false report against Ronald Ritchie, the 911 caller in the John Crawford case.  

The group held a press conference Wednesday evening at the Coretta Scott King Center on the Antioch College Campus in Yellow Springs.

In his decision, Piepmeier said there was no evidence to suggest that Ritchie’s report was intentionally false.

A special prosecutor says a 911 caller won't be charged for reporting a man waving a gun in an Ohio Wal-Mart before police fatally shot him.

The decision was announced Monday by Mark Piepmeier, the same prosecutor who presented the case to a grand jury. It concluded the August 2014 shooting of 22-year-old John Crawford III at the Beavercreek store, near Dayton, was justified.

The 911 caller told investigators he thought Crawford had a real firearm, but it was actually an air rifle Crawford had picked up from the shelf.

Tressa Sherrod via Facebook

Possible criminal charges against the 911 caller in the John Crawford Case are still up in the air, as is the federal investigation of potential charges against officers who shot and killed Crawford responding to that call.

 

Last week, Fairborn Municipal Court Judge Beth Root ruled there was probable cause to seek a misdemeanor charge of filing a false report against Ronald Ritchie, the 911 caller who reported that John Crawford III was waving a rifle at customers in a Beavercreek Wal-Mart.

 

Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

For the first time, Ohio’s law enforcement agencies now have a set of minimum standards for the use of deadly force and for recruitment and hiring, but the panel that set those standards says there’s a lot more work ahead.

The development of the standards is the first milestone for a panel that was proposed last year, after the police shot and killed 22-year-old John Crawford in the Beavercreek Wal-Mart outside Dayton, and 12-year-old Tamir Rice in a park in Cleveland.

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