Jobs

The oil and gas boom has brought in lots of activity to eastern Ohio, and perhaps lots of out of state workers. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports says that’s a problem for the governor.

Gov. John Kasich has joked several times about the people he wants to see working with the oil and gas industry in Ohio, including in his State of the State speech in February.

The Air Force says the cancelation of a computer modernization program will cost 115 contract employees their jobs at Wright-Patterson Air Force base.

Base spokesman Daryl Mayer said Thursday that cancelation of the Expeditionary Combat Support System program also means that an additional 55 civilian and military employees will be reassigned from that program.

Mayer says the canceled program had been intended to replace some older computer systems to meet statutory requirements for financial and audit readiness mandated by Congress.

Ohio is facing a catch-22. Because the state's official unemployment rate has dropped to a full percentage point below the national average, the federal government is cutting back its share of emergency unemployment benefits to jobless Ohioans.

Ben Johnson, with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, says people will notice the cutback at the beginning of December.

A new survey shows a majority of voters over 50 in Ohio and across the country have serious reservations about when – or if – they’ll be able to retire. And because of that, they’re saying the presidential candidates need to talk more about Social Security and Medicare. The poll commissioned by AARP surveyed voters in Ohio and five other states, and pollster Guy Molyneaux says overall, baby boomer voters are pessimistic.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for July 29, 2012 including the following stories:

-Refugees Find A Place To Grow In Dayton, by Community Voices producer Tracy Staley

-New Ohio Guide: Birthplace of a President, by Meg Hanrahan

-Jerry Kenney speaks with Generation Opportunity president Paul Conway about the challenges many high school and college graduates are facing when trying to enter the job market

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for June 10, 2012 containing the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney speaks with Martine Meredith Collier from CultureWorks about a write-in campaign that resulted in Dayton being named the number 2 mid-sized city for the arts by American Style Magazine. 

-New Ohio Guide: A City of Neighborhoods – Ethnic Enclaves in Cleveland, by Karen Schaefer

 

A recent survey conducted by MadeInDaytonBlog.Com indicates that many manufacturing jobs in the Dayton area remain unfilled, despite large numbers of people looking for work.

The blog was started back in December as a clearinghouse for local manufacturers to communicate needs and exchange ideas.  More than a hundred companies responded to the survey and said they have jobs that have remained unfilled – and many say the disconnect between available jobs and the unemployed comes down to skills. 

Dayton Area Sees Job Growth From Last Year

Jun 5, 2012

The Dayton area added 48 hundred jobs during the past year. That’s from a report released this week by a national business journal called On Numbers. As WYSO’s Emily McCord explains, it’s the second year in a row of job growth.

Bob Evans Farms Inc. says it will close two food production plants in Ohio next year and beef up its production at a Texas facility.

 The Ohio-based restaurant and food company plans to shut down plants in Springfield and Bidwell in southern Ohio next summer as it focuses on convenience foods, packaged side dishes and other higher-growth opportunities.

The move will mean over 50 jobs lost in Springfield and will affect about 110 employees overall. The company says it will try to place some of them in other jobs with Bob Evans.

Ellen Belcher, who's filling in for Emily McCord, interviews Richard Vedder, the author of a new study advocating that Ohio become a "right to work" state. Next year Ohioans could vote on whether employers can require their workers to join a union to get and keep their jobs.

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