Jobs

An airplane at the Vectren Dayton Airshow, a yearly event at the Dayton Airport.
eawortman / Flickr/Creative Commons

Janet Bednarek, a professor of history at the University of Dayton, specializes in airports—and in the idea of the airport as a hub for economic growth. She thinks airports bring a lot of potential, but there are also limitations; ultimately, she says, corporations decide where they want to go, and an “if you build it, they will come” approach can backfire.

“Dayton has always tried to capitalize on the fact that we’re at the intersection of two major interstates,” says Bednarek. “It just seems like the ability to capitalize on that hasn’t seemed to happen yet.”

This Labor Day, there are a record low number of Ohioans in the labor force—fewer than there have been since October 1978. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports just 59 percent of Americans 16 and over have declared that they are part of the labor force; in Ohio, that figure is just under 63 percent, a 34-year low. That’s not the only thing that has the progressives at Policy Matters Ohio worried. Amy Hanauer says the group’s annual Labor Day report also shows the state lost more than 2.3 percent of its jobs since 2005, while the country added 3.8 percent in that same period.

The logo for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services
WOSU

State and national jobless numbers are closely watched as economic indicators, and the unemployment figures can also give useful clues for those seeking their first full-time job.

Last month, 323,000 Ohio adults were actively seeking work and not able to find a job, and the unemployment rate crept up for the first time in several months. The figure includes recent high school and college graduates looking for that first job, or an entry level job.

Nicola / Flickr/Creative Commons

Whirlpool Corporation is breaking ground Wednesday on an expanded KitchenAid factory in Greenville, 40 miles northwest of Dayton, with plans to add hundreds of jobs in the next few years.

 

The Michigan-based company has been expanding its manufacturing operations in parts of the U.S. since about 2010, and now plans to spend $40 million over five years to nearly double the size of the Greenville facility, where it makes stand mixers and a few other appliances.

wright-patterson air force base gates
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

Thousands of civilian workers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are being offered the option to retire early or take a buyout. The buyouts are an effort to prepare for a cut of 372 positions at the base this fall.

Many of the positions to be cut aren’t currently filled, and by offering early retirement and buyout options, Wright-Patt officials hope to move those who stay into open jobs elsewhere on the base.

“We just want to make sure that we take care of our people, that’s our key objective,” says Wright-Patt spokesman Daryl Mayer.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

What if everything in your favorite store was 30 percent off, or even 10 percent...every single day? Well, in theory, that’s what the employee discount is about. You work somewhere, you love the stuff, you buy the stuff. Apple, J-Crew and Barnes and Noble are just a few of the retailers known for offering good deals to their workers. And almost all stores offer some kind of discount.

Annie Chapman has worked at Foy’s Halloween and Variety in Fairborn for ten years.

Gary DeWitt, the general manager of the new Hollywood Gaming racino in north Dayton, points out features of the main gaming room.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The Hollywood Gaming racino in north Dayton is getting closer to its opening day. Parent company Penn National spent around $6 million on cleanup of the old Delphi plant site, and now a new building, a racetrack, and almost 2000 parking spots are going in at the corner of Needmore and Wagner Ford roads.

Dayton’s first Startup Weekend is taking place at the Entrepreneurs Center in Tech Town beginning Friday. At startup weekends around the country and the world, people with business concepts come in on a Friday, pitch an idea, and form a plan by the end of the weekend.

Organizer Dave Best says the goal is mainly to get people motivated.

Workers march to deliver "strike papers" to Walmart officials. Nov 2013
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

A protest is coming to the Dayton Walmart on York Commons Wednesday as part of a week of protests and employee walkouts at Walmart stores around the country. Walmart workers and supporters of a living wage increase by the retail giant will be joined by State Rep. Connie Pillich (D-28). She believes an across-the-board wage boost would help struggling families.

“We’re talking about a living wage,” says Pillich. “We’re making sure that people at Walmart and other places in Ohio, can earn enough money and get enough work hours to support their families.”

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

Ohio’s unemployment rate for April came out late last week, and it’s as low as it’s been since 2008 at 5.7 percent. It’s also nearly half a percent lower than the rate reported for March, despite relatively slow job growth.

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