WYSO

Immigration reform

April Laissle / WYSO

About 100 people rallied against the Trump Administration’s immigration policies at a protest Thursday in front of Representative Mike Turner’s office in downtown Dayton.  

Advocacy group Dayton Indivisible For All organized the so-called “We Belong Together” rally to denounce the separation of immigrant families seeking asylum at U.S. border crossings.

The Miller Dairy Farm in Logan County, just south of Belle Center, Ohio, is a hundred and five acres of rolling green pastures. It’s home to a hundred or so dairy cows and another 200 heifers. They’ve got a few horses, some sheep, a llama and other barnya
Jerry Kenney

The H-2A Temporary Agricultural Workers visa program allows seasonal immigrants to legally work in the United States. Demand for H-2A visa workers is up dramatically nationwide, as many farms have had trouble finding enough employees to fill open jobs.  

Darshini Parthasarathy is a student at Miami University.
Darshini Parthasarathy

The United States Supreme Court recently allowed the Trump administration’s travel ban to take effect while lawsuits challenging it continue to make their way through the courts. The ban restricts entry into the U.S. by travelers from eight mostly Muslim-majority countries: Somalia, Syria, Iran, Libya, Yemen, Chad, North Korea and Venezuela.

DACA currently permits nearly 800,000 people to temporarily work and study in the United States. Most are under age 19. Department of Homeland Security statistics show 9,600 DACA recipients live in Ohio
Jess Mador / WYSO

About 100 people rallied in Dayton Tuesday in support of a program allowing young people brought to the country illegally as children to remain in the United States.

The protest was hastily organized after the Trump administration’s announcement it would phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. 

President Donald Trump is calling for Congress to come up with a replacement for the Obama-era DACA program within six months. 

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city council has declared Cincinnati as a "sanctuary city," a label that isn't legally defined but typically indicates reduced cooperation with federal immigration authorities on some matters involving people who are in the U.S. illegally.

It's mostly symbolic. Mayor John Cranley has said Cincinnati has long welcomed immigrants and will continue to support them, but won't break federal law.

Supporters and opponents of the move packed the council meeting.

Demonstrators at a 2010 protest in Washington D.C. demanding immigration reform. Several efforts since have failed in Congress.
Nevele Otseog / Flickr/Creative Commons

A representative of the White House addressed advocates in Dayton Thursday about their efforts to make immigrants welcome, but immigration reform was the elephant in the room.

A Clark County non-profit is starting a research study on health care access for immigrants.  A grant from CareSource is paying for the project.

Carl Ruby is with the non-profit support group Welcome Springfield, which helps immigrants living in Clark County. He says a high rate of Latinos in the county are uninsured, and that causes problems for them.

Feds May Not Need Dayton To Host Immigrant Children

Aug 7, 2014

A controversy could be fizzling out over whether Dayton will host immigrant children from Central America in temporary shelters. The federal government told Mayor Nan Whaley it might not need the help, after all.

Wayne Baker / WYSO

Several evangelical leaders gathered in Springfield Monday afternoon to discuss immigration reform. The group shared their plans to meet with members of Congress in order to voice support for the reform issue.

Several members of the Clark County Latino community gathered at the Iglesia Espana Emanuel Church to hear the evangelical leaders frame the need for immigration reform.

Dr. William Brown of Cedarville University, a conservative institute of higher learning, says he backs reform.

Immigration reform might be dead in Washington for now, but some local advocates are still on the case. One of those is long-time conservative activist and teacher Carl Ruby. He’s part of a new initiative called Welcome Springfield—a takeoff on Welcome Dayton—to work on making Springfield a more appealing place for immigrants.

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