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housing

Miami Valley Fair Housing investigated more than 70 Fannie Mae properties from 2010, 2012, and 2014.
MVFHC / MVFHC

Recent numbers show Montgomery County home values are continuing to recover after the Great Recession.

Montgomery County Auditor Karl Keith says, while commercial property values remained stable with a less than 1 percent increase, residential values are up about 6 percent. 

He says the increase in home values is good news for the housing market.

“To talk about a four-and-a-half-percent increase, yes, this is definitely good news. It reflects on the community as a whole as far as value, the overall economy of the community," Keith says. 

In Wolf Creek and Dayton View, hundreds of homes still stand empty. west dayton abandoned house tour
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Housing values in Montgomery County are expected to rise next year, according to preliminary data from the Montgomery County Auditor’s office.  

Auditor Karl Keith says the projections are based on what looks like an improving economy, a stronger real estate market and an increase in property sales.

“You go back three years ago we saw values overall drop in Montgomery County drop by about 4%. If you go three years beyond that, in 2011, values dropped," he said. 

Report: Affordable Housing Out Of Reach For Many Ohioans

Jun 1, 2016
Home for sale sign
Dan Moyle / Flickr Creative Commons

A new report says someone earning minimum wage would have to work 71 hours a week to afford a basic two-bedroom apartment in Ohio. 

The study by the National Low Income Housing Coalition said statewide, a person has to be making on average about $14.50 an hour just to afford a modest apartment in Ohio.

Bill Faith with the Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio says the state can help by increasing funding to the Housing Trust Fund which expands access to affordable housing.

In Wolf Creek and Dayton View, hundreds of homes still stand empty. west dayton abandoned house tour
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Since the housing market collapse in the late 2000s, Dayton and Montgomery County have been demolishing hundreds of abandoned houses per year.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The state says three organizations have received more than $1 million in federal funds to provide housing assistance and limited case management services for Ohioans with HIV and AIDS.

The Ohio Development Services Agency says the grant winners are: the Community AIDS Network in Portage and Summit counties; COMPASS Family in Mahoning County; and the AIDS Resource Center Ohio. The center will use the funds to provide housing services to those in Athens, Canton, Dayton, Lima, Mansfield, Marion, Toledo and the surrounding counties.

A sketch of the future Water Street District in downtown Dayton on the riverfront.
Courtesy of developers Crawford Hoying and Woodard.

The ground was officially broken at Dayton’s Water Street apartment development Thursday morning. The 215-unit luxury apartment complex is part of an investment partnership between Columbus-based Crawford Hoying and Dayton based Woodard Real Estate. The original plan called for fewer units and less money invested, but the project has expanded since it was first announced.

Antioch College Aims To Build Sustainable Village On Campus
Image courtesty of Antioch College

This weekend Antioch College kicks off a community input process for a housing project that would be located on the college campus.

Housing, and especially affordable housing, is a big issue in Yellow Springs—where housing prices never tanked the way they did regionally, and both rentals and purchases run high.

A House Made of Straw

Nov 28, 2014
Bob Brecha's strawbale house
Bob Brecha

When University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha and his wife decided to have a home built awhile back, they were intrigued by the idea of having straw as the key ingredient; stacks of it, covered by mud plaster. And if that sounds flimsy, possibly cold, listen to his story of the making of a strawbale house in Yellow Springs.

 

An under-maintained home in a black neighborhood.
Miami Valley Fair Housing

Cities in Ohio and around the country are continuing to recover from the housing bust, but some neighborhoods may be having an easier time than others. A new study by the National Fair Housing Alliance (NFHA) finds banks are doing a better job with upkeep on foreclosed homes in white neighborhoods than neighborhoods of color.

NFHA worked with groups in 29 metro areas, including Dayton and Toledo, to inspect thousands of bank-owned homes.

 A complex new set of rules designed to limit risky loans is in place as of this week for mortgage bankers. The regulations were developed in response to the 2008 financial crisis.

That 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law was, among other things, supposed to make it harder for banks to issue mortgages fast and loose.

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