HIV

Today is World AIDS Day (WAD), and it’s estimated that more than 20,000 people in Ohio are infected with HIV—about 2000 of those cases are here in the Miami Valley.

In recent years treatment has become more accessible, but successful treatment depends on early detection.  Bill Hardy with AIDS Resource Center Ohio says early detection can mean viral suppression.

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

This week, health officials hope to hope to raise awareness about the importance of HIV prevention and education, particularly within the region’s Latino community.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that just four years ago, in 2010, close to 6,700 new HIV infections were detected among Latino populations. 

Citing those national figures, Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County stated, “the largest number of new [HIV] infections among Latino gay and bisexual men occurred among those aged 25 to 34.”

Payne Seminary

The NAACP and Payne Theological Seminary in Wilberforce have partnered to tackle the issue of HIV and AIDS in the black community. The civil rights organization says its research shows that one in sixteen black men and one in thirty-two black women will contract HIV.

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

HIV infection rates are still on the rise in Ohio and across the country. On this 25th annual World AIDS Day, health officials urge testing and education to stop new cases from developing.

17,000 people in Ohio are known to be HIV positive, but that number doesn’t tell the whole story.  It’s estimated that 1 in 5 people with HIV don’t even know they’re infected, so the problem is much worse. 

Thursday, February 7th is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, and the Centers for Disease Control say that, although blacks make up just 14% of the national population, they account for about 44% of all new HIV infections.

Here in Ohio, Blacks make up just twelve percent of the population but account for almost half – 49% of all new HIV infections.  So, health organizations around the country, including Ohio, say they’re mobilizing to encourage populations of color to get educated, get tested, get involved, and get treated.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a preventative drug for HIV.  The drug is called Truvada, and though it has been hailed as good news in the fight against HIV / AIDS, says there are some concerns associated with the treatment.  Bill Hardy with AIDS Resource Center Ohio gives us the pros and cons in this ARC update on WYSO's Morning Edition.

For years, the Rubi Girls have entertained local audiences, and audiences around the country. In their twenty years together, it's estimated they've helped raise several hundred thousand dollars for HIV/AIDS prevention and research. We spoke with them recently about their history and the fun they have working for a serious cause. Here's part of that interview.

Today - on this World AIDS day - in Ohio there are about 16,000 identified cases of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, that number changes significantly when you consider that an estimated 20% of the people infected with the disease aren't aware that they have it.

When the first cases of Aids started showing up, the prognosis for adults with the disease wasn't good. As children began to be born with HIV, The situation was just as dire and death rates were high.

"Early on, we didn't have much treatment we could do to prevent the infection from worsening, so it was really symptomatic care treating the infections, treating the complications, but the mortality was pretty high, and all those kids unfortunately died at a very young age," says Dr. Sherman Alter is the Director of Infectious Diseases at Children's Medical Center of Dayton.

HIV Program Cuts

Jul 7, 2010

Last week, the Ohio Department of Health announced changes to a national program that serves people living with HIV/AIDS. Changes to the Ryan White program will cut medical services, restrict eligibility, institute a services wait list, and reduce medications currently offered by the program.

Right now more than 14ooo Ohio residents living with HIV/AIDS are served by the program, but escalating costs and a projected state defecit of 16.4mil will cut that number.