WYSO

Heroin

The Montgomery County Family Treatment Court, was recently awarded a three year grant that will be used to improve the safety and well-being of children caught up in the opioid epidemic.

 

To get the details on how the grant will help, WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Juvenile Court Judge Tony Capizzi, who oversees the program.

 

 

Additional information from Montgomery County:

Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio’s Attorney General has been doing events around the state in the last few weeks, to bring more awareness to the state’s drug opioid epidemic. That crisis was brought into a harsh spotlight recently thanks to a photo of two Ohioans who nearly died from their heroin use.

Mike DeWine says he has mixed feelings about the East Liverpool police photo that went viral, featuring a couple overdosing on heroin in a van with a four year old buckled in a seat behind them.

A new Ohio law offers immunity from prosecution to people trying to get help for someone overdosing on drugs or overdose victims themselves who seek assistance.

The law taking effect Tuesday covers people calling 911, contacting a police officer or taking an overdose victim to a medical facility for up to two times. They would again be subject to prosecution on the third call.

 

Heroin Fentanyl Pills.
Drug Enforcement Agency

A recent spike of heroin related overdose deaths in southwest Ohio has officials across state lines concerned and looking for answers. To get more details on what those possible answers might be, WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Terry DeMio, a reporter on the heroin beat for the Cincinnati inquirer to get the latest details.

Tom Kavana/Flickr Creative Commons

The head of a Cincinnati-area drug task force is calling on the state to declare a public health emergency to free up more resources for fighting heroin.

After a recent spike of overdoses, Newtown Police Chief Tom Synan, who heads the task force, is calling the situation a public health crisis. 

Police in Cincinnati are asking for the public's help in finding the source of the suspected heroin behind an estimated 78 overdoses in just two days this week.

Authorities believe the same batch is linked to three recent deaths.

They say there were an estimated 78 overdoses on Tuesday and Wednesday and a total of 174 overdoses in emergency rooms within the past week.

Local officials are calling it a public health emergency.

Thomas Marthinsen

Drug overdose deaths are still on the rise in Montgomery County according to first quarter 2016 numbers.

The Montgomery County Poisoning Death Review tracks and analyzes unintentional drug overdose deaths. According to its report, early 2016 saw a 130% increase in the number of drug overdose deaths in the County compared to the first quarter of 2015.

The report indicates a 26% increase in deaths from illicit Fentanyl in the community. 

Ohio troopers say they seized about seven times as much heroin during the first half of 2016 as they did during the same period last year.

The State Highway Patrol attributes the increase at least in part to several large drug busts.

The rise comes amid other signs that Ohio's opiate problems continue to grow. The Cleveland area saw 15 overdose deaths in a recent three-day span that were attributed to heroin, the synthetic opiate fentanyl or a combination of those.

Customs officials in Cincinnati seized 10 pounds of heroin in one summer shipment.

www.heroinaddiction.com

The overdose death of a pregnant woman in Clark County this week is yet another reminder of the growing epidemic of drug addiction.  In 2015, there were 73 drug overdose deaths in Clark County, almost double from the previous year.  Almost all of them were related to heroin or fentanyl, a much stronger drug than heroin.  Officials say buyers often don't know which one they're getting.

April Laissle

Montgomery County has the second highest heroin overdose rate in the state of Ohio. It’s a problem that has left commissioners from the City of Dayton and Montgomery County desperate for answers.

 

At a crowded joint meeting held to discuss the epidemic, representatives from area health organizations explained the hard facts of the issue, and why tackling it has become so complex.

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