Healthcare

Barely

The University of Dayton's says it will continue to offer employee health insurance that covers contraceptive care and isn't changing the plan because of the fight over a new federal policy on birth control.

Ohio's largest county has decided to expand health care benefit access for gay county employees to include
their partners' children.

The Plain Dealer newspaper in Cleveland reports the Cuyahoga (ky-uh-HOH'-guh) County Council voted 6-4 to
approve the change Tuesday.

The county doesn't give the same benefits to the children of unmarried heterosexual couples. Council members noted that heterosexual couples could wed to get benefits for their children, but gay couples didn't have that option.

Catholic leaders in Ohio are joining the chorus of church officials urging parishioners to protest and pray about the federal government's decision to require many church-affiliated institutions to cover free birth control for
employees.

Bishops in Cincinnati, Cleveland and Toledo shared their opposition in letters distributed or read to parishioners this weekend, saying the decision runs counter to their beliefs.

Ohio's work to make sure more children have health coverage has earned the state $21 million in federal bonus funding.

U.S. health officials say Ohio is receiving bonus money for a second straight year. Health Secretary Kathleen Sebelius says in a statement that more of Ohio's children now have the advantages health coverage provides.

Only 22 other states qualified for bonuses.

To receive the funding, states must surpass a Medicaid enrollment target and improve access to Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program, known as CHIP.

Our latest episode features special guest Dr. Sharon Sherlock, Executive Director for Reach Out Dayton.  The Reach Out Dayton clinic provides free medical care to residents of Montgomery County, Ohio who find themselves without health insurance. 

While Ohioans overwhelmingly rejected Issue two, the limits on collective bargaining, they overwhelmingly endorsed issue three. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

Dale Butland with Innovation Ohio… says now that voters have passed issue three, they will soon begin to see they’ve been sold something for which they didn’t bargain.

"When the taxpayers learn that they're on the hook for millions of dollars in unnecessary lawsuits and legal expenses, the Republican officials who endorsed this amendment for purely political reasons will be unmasked," says Butand.

Here are this morning's results on Statewide Ballot Issues:

Issue 1 (Proposed Constitutional Amendment to increase the maximum age at which a person may be elected or appointed judge and eliminate certain authorities)

NO: 62.03% (2,036,080 votes)
YES: 37.97% (1,246,535)

Issue 2 (Proposed Referendum to repeal Senate Bill 5)

NO: 61.33% (2,145,042 votes)
YES: 38.67% (1,352,366 votes)

School and local government employees belonging to more than 550 health insurance plans across Ohio will see their share of health care costs rise if voters approve a collective bargaining law this fall, state data show.

Opponents say the union-limiting bill will hurt tens of thousands of average workers around the state.  Supporters argue having employees pay a bigger share of their health care costs will save government money and align more fairly with the private sector.

The new law will require public employees to pay 15% health-care costs.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - A report prepared for the state says some Ohio health insurance premiums could go up as much as 150 percent while others could fall 40 percent in 2014 when much of the national health care overhaul takes effect.

Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor, who also heads the state insurance department, says the findings from consulting firm Milliman Inc. are "alarming." The Republican said in a news release Tuesday that what she calls "Obamacare" will have widespread and expensive impacts.

KISSIMMEE, Fla. (AP) - Not every clinic run by the Veterans Affairs Department has a practitioner designated to provide care in women's health. The VA is trying to change that.

The VA has been bringing hundreds of doctors and nurse practitioners to mini-residency workshops where they learn about women's health and practice doing pelvic exams. The topics include how to talk to female veterans who may have been sexually assaulted.

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