Healthcare

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for June 24, 2012 containing the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney speaks with Fran Tiburzio from the Ohio Humanities Council about Ohio Chautauqua coming to Urbana.

-WYSO Community Voices coordinator Sarah Buckingham join Jerry Kenney to talk about the WYSO Open House

-New Ohio Guide: Paths to Freedom – The Underground Railroad in Ohio, by Meg Hanrahan

Five of the six managed care organizations that lost bids for state Medicaid contracts have filed protests with Ohio officials.

This month, Ohio chose the contract winners that will provide health care services for more than 1.5 million poor and disabled people.

The Columbus Dispatch reports companies that lost out on the billions of dollars in work say the Department of Job and Family Services made errors in awarding the contracts. Several companies allege scoring on bid applications was miscalculated.

A department spokesman says the protests will be reviewed.

XavierUniversity in Cincinnati has announced that it will no longer provide birth control insurance coverage for employees.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that President of the Catholic university, Michael J. Graham,says the decision as prompted by national debate over a provision in President Barack Obama's health care law that requires insurers to provide such coverage.

Xavier says the change, announced Monday, goes into effect July 1. The university has about 950 faculty and staff and did not know how many would be affected.

Barely

The University of Dayton's says it will continue to offer employee health insurance that covers contraceptive care and isn't changing the plan because of the fight over a new federal policy on birth control.

Ohio's largest county has decided to expand health care benefit access for gay county employees to include
their partners' children.

The Plain Dealer newspaper in Cleveland reports the Cuyahoga (ky-uh-HOH'-guh) County Council voted 6-4 to
approve the change Tuesday.

The county doesn't give the same benefits to the children of unmarried heterosexual couples. Council members noted that heterosexual couples could wed to get benefits for their children, but gay couples didn't have that option.

Catholic leaders in Ohio are joining the chorus of church officials urging parishioners to protest and pray about the federal government's decision to require many church-affiliated institutions to cover free birth control for
employees.

Bishops in Cincinnati, Cleveland and Toledo shared their opposition in letters distributed or read to parishioners this weekend, saying the decision runs counter to their beliefs.

Ohio's work to make sure more children have health coverage has earned the state $21 million in federal bonus funding.

U.S. health officials say Ohio is receiving bonus money for a second straight year. Health Secretary Kathleen Sebelius says in a statement that more of Ohio's children now have the advantages health coverage provides.

Only 22 other states qualified for bonuses.

To receive the funding, states must surpass a Medicaid enrollment target and improve access to Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program, known as CHIP.

Our latest episode features special guest Dr. Sharon Sherlock, Executive Director for Reach Out Dayton.  The Reach Out Dayton clinic provides free medical care to residents of Montgomery County, Ohio who find themselves without health insurance. 

While Ohioans overwhelmingly rejected Issue two, the limits on collective bargaining, they overwhelmingly endorsed issue three. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

Dale Butland with Innovation Ohio… says now that voters have passed issue three, they will soon begin to see they’ve been sold something for which they didn’t bargain.

"When the taxpayers learn that they're on the hook for millions of dollars in unnecessary lawsuits and legal expenses, the Republican officials who endorsed this amendment for purely political reasons will be unmasked," says Butand.

Here are this morning's results on Statewide Ballot Issues:

Issue 1 (Proposed Constitutional Amendment to increase the maximum age at which a person may be elected or appointed judge and eliminate certain authorities)

NO: 62.03% (2,036,080 votes)
YES: 37.97% (1,246,535)

Issue 2 (Proposed Referendum to repeal Senate Bill 5)

NO: 61.33% (2,145,042 votes)
YES: 38.67% (1,352,366 votes)

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