Health

Dayton Children's is also expanding in the city of Dayton, with this new patient tower.
Dayton Children's Hospital

Dayton Children’s hospital broke ground Thursday on a new eight-story building on its campus. The center is part of a long-term plan to improve patient care. 

Officials at Children’s say their current facilities can’t serve all their needs.  The 260,000-square-foot tower will house a new intensive care unit for newborns, a Cancer and Blood Disorder Center, and new patient care units.

But the hospital's President and CEO, Deborah Feldman, says the long-term plan is about improving the hospital, not necessarily expanding it.

LollyKnit / Flickr/Creative Commons

Hunger and food insecurity are still major problems in the Miami Valley even as the economic recovery gradually gets more people working. The Foodbank of the Miami Valley says it’s doing better meeting local residents’ needs than it was four years ago. That’s the last time a group called Feeding America did its periodic national survey of food banks and their users.

Ohio Health Agency Urges Vaccines As Classes Start

Aug 18, 2014

The Ohio Department of Health is urging parents to make sure children are up-to-date on vaccinations to protect them and their classmates as they begin a new school year.
 
The department says children who aren't vaccinated have a higher risk of contracting and spreading illnesses such as measles and mumps. Ohio has dealt with outbreaks of both of those diseases this year.
 
The mumps outbreak in central Ohio stood at 479 cases as of this week, with just over half of those cases linked to Ohio State University.
 

Public Health - Dayton and Montgomery County

Montgomery County Health Commissioner Jim Gross has announced his retirement. The commissioner was appointed to the position with Public Health – Dayton & Montgomery County seven years ago and will retire early next year. 

“I’m very proud of the work that Public Health – Dayton & Montgomery County does within our county,” Gross says. We provide leadership in many areas and help identify the greatest public health challenges, and then we work within our public health system to strategically meet those needs and also promote healthier lifestyles.”

It’s the last week to sign up for health plans under the Affordable Care Act—the deadline is Monday, March 31. As people continue to wade through the confusion surrounding the law, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced it will offer some wiggle room on the deadline.

Ohio officials are reporting over 23,000 people newly eligible for Medicaid in Ohio got enrolled in January, after Ohio Governor John Kasich decided to expand the insurance program to cover more low-income people using Affordable Care Act funds.

Medicaid can be tricky to quantify, however.

At the Montgomery County Job Center’s health care room, the people coming in are a mix—some have been on and off Medicaid, and some are signing up for subsidized care for the first time.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The AIDS Resource Center of Ohio, or ARC, has opened a new medical center near the University of Dayton campus. The center will be funded in part by its own in-house pharmacy on the first floor of the Wright Health Building, where the center will take over the second floor.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) was in Dayton Thursday promoting a newly-passed federal law that aims to protect kids with allergies. Brown is also urging passage of a state law in Ohio that would make the allergy drug epinephrine, usually known as the EpiPen, widely available in schools.

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

HIV infection rates are still on the rise in Ohio and across the country. On this 25th annual World AIDS Day, health officials urge testing and education to stop new cases from developing.

17,000 people in Ohio are known to be HIV positive, but that number doesn’t tell the whole story.  It’s estimated that 1 in 5 people with HIV don’t even know they’re infected, so the problem is much worse. 

Whooping Cough Cases On Track For Highest Total Since 2010

Nov 11, 2013

The name makes it sound like an old-fashioned disease, but whooping cough cases are up. And state health officials are encouraging Ohioans to get booster shots.

The Ohio Department of Health says the highly contagious cough is one of the most commonly occurring, but vaccine-preventable, diseases in the United States. Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is usually spread by coughing or sneezing.

It often starts with cold-like symptoms before turning into a persistent cough with spasms.

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