Great Miami River

The Taylorsville Dam in Vandalia is one of five dams in the Miami Conservancy District.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

This month marks the 100-year anniversary of the Miami Conservancy District, the flood protection system that was installed up and down the Great Miami River basin after the infamous Great Dayton Flood of 1913.

Listener Ellen Duell asked WYSO Curious a timely question:

“I wanted to know if the dams are still being protected, and how the conservancy district is operating to keep us from more great floods,” Duell said.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has finished a one-year study of the Great Miami River Corridor, which looked at opportunities for economic development along a 99-mile stretch. The area studied runs from around Sidney, up in Shelby County, down to the city of Hamilton in Butler County.

An artist's rendering of the new kayak run plan along the Great Miami River in downtown Dayton.
Five Rivers Metroparks

Five Rivers Metroparks has announced changes to the plan for a downtown Dayton kayaking run, which means a delayed timeline for the Riverscape River Run.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton’s Mad River wellfield is on a grassy island in the middle of one of the city’s three major rivers. Phil Van Atta, head of Dayton’s water treatment operation, says the wellfield, where Dayton pumps up groundwater from the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, is one of his favorite places. The shallow sand and gravel aquifer in some places lies just feet below the ground, and its 1.5 trillion gallons of freshwater is constantly recharging from the rivers and rainfall.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Human-caused climate change is expected to have devastating effects across the country and world. The Midwest is somewhat insulated from extremes of drought or rising seas, but a recent report finds Ohio could see costly effects ranging from flooding to dangerous extreme heat spells by the end of the century.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Scientists around the country are ringing alarm bells about climate change, and some of the effects are already hitting the Dayton area. A local study of attitudes on climate change finds many people are concerned, but it also finds people are not sure what to do about climate change nor confident that it will be addressed.

(WYSO/Lewis Wallace)

 

 Montgomery County voted on Tuesday to put $50,000 towards a Great Miami River master plan. More than a dozen cities and towns along the river are also pitching in to match funds provided by a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for a program that helps states plan waterfront development.

The local partnership with the Corps is headed off by the Miami Conservancy District, and participants hope it will help turn the river into a regional cash cow.

The University of Dayton is unveiling their new RiverMobile, a mobile learning studio that puts the region's five rivers on 18 wheels. 

RiverMobile is a traveling exhibit converted from a semi-trailer that highlights one of our greatest local resources, the Great Miami River watershed.  the mobile unit was built by students in the University's Rivers Institute, and local donors provided a lot of support for the project. It's being unveiled this morning as part of the sixth-annual River Summit at the University of Dayton River Campus.