Ohio statehouse
thoth188 / Flickr Creative Commons

Closed-door negotiations over a new way to draw Ohio’s Congressional map have broken down. Ohio lawmakers and representatives from citizens’ groups left the Statehouse late Wednesday night without coming to an agreement.

The two sides have been trying to amend a redistricting plan GOP lawmakers want in a way that would be acceptable to citizens’ groups that are pushing their own reform for the fall ballot.

But shortly after 10 p.m.  Wednesday, Catherine Turcer from Common Cause Ohio said changes had not been enough to accomplish her groups’ basic goals.

In Ohio, state lawmakers and voting advocates are working on perhaps-competing plans to revamp Congressional redistricting. But ours is not the only state struggling with how political maps are drawn. A Wisconsin case is before the U.S. Supreme Court. A voter initiative is underway in Michigan. Lawmakers are debating change in Pennsylvania. And California has replaced politicians with a citizen commission. In the final installment of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze looks at the efforts here and elsewhere.

Ohio statehouse
thoth188 / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio lawmakers have finally come to a bipartisan agreement on redistricting that many are calling historic. The process of drawing lines for legislative districts has been controversial in the past, but an agreement passed in the Senate Friday will be sold to Ohioans as a way to make that process more fair.

“This is the most significant bi-partisan activity that I have been involved in in my time here in the House and the general assembly,” said Democratic State Representative Vernon Sykes, who’s leaving after 26 years in the statehouse.

Washington Gridlock Rooted In Gerrymandering

Dec 20, 2013
Dayton Daily News

The way states draw congressional districts may be a contributing factor to the dysfunction of today's political climate, according to an investigation by the Dayton Daily News published earlier this week. While gerrymandering is nothing new, it's now much easier.

The Ohio Supreme Court has made a long-awaited decision on whether the maps for state House and Senate districts drawn by elected leaders last year are valid. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports.