Gas Drilling

A newspaper reports that injection drilling in Ohio hasn't met the initial expectations of state officials this year.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that Ohio Department of Natural Resources officials had told state legislators in March that as many as 250 of the natural-gas and oil wells would be drilled in eastern Ohio Utica shale by the end of the year.

But state records show that only 165 wells have been completed, with 22 more being drilled.

The U.S. Forest Service says the shale drilling technique for natural gas known as hydraulic fracturing can take place in a national forest in southeast Ohio.

The Forest Service released its report Monday after a study of a land and resource management plan drafted in 2006 for the Wayne National Forest.

Forest Supervisor Anne Carey says that plan can adequately address any damage and risks to the forest from the gas extraction method also known as fracking.

She also says a new environmental impact study is not needed.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for August 19, 2012 including the following stories: 

-Vitruvian Brew Co Opening In Yellow Springs, Community Voices producer Jennifer Carlson

-New Ohio Guide: Neil Armstrong Museum, by Aileen LeBlanc

The legislature has passed a package that sets new regulations on oil and natural gas drillers who are rushing into Ohio to explore the state’s big Utica and Marcellus shale deposits.

Doctors given new access to the proprietary chemical recipes that oil and gas drillers use to crack into Ohio shale would be prohibited from sharing the information with the public under an energy proposal moving through the Ohio House.

Gerry Dincher

Proposed rules for allowing drilling in Ohio's state parks would require natural gas and oil companies to stay at least 300 feet - the length of a football field - from campgrounds, certain waterways and sites deemed historically or archeologically valuable.

The Columbus Dispatch reports Thursday that the proposals for drilling leases also include an 89-page list of "best management practices."

The boom in drilling for natural gas trapped in layers of shale has been good news for a handful of Ohio companies that supply the type of sand needed for such drilling.

Rob Sidley's family-owned company in northeast Ohio processes sand that is perfect for the drilling process because it's nearly 100 percent quartz as well as round, hard and water resistant.

The Akron Beacon Journal reported Monday that companies like Sidley's have a valuable commodity since 6,000 to 8,000 tons of sand are needed to drill one well.

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