WYSO

Environmental Protection Agency

Landfill Controversy Subject Of Public Forum

Apr 9, 2014

A public forum Wednesday in Springfield is the latest in an ongoing debate over how to clean up a Clark County landfill. Residents have been at odds with the US Environmental Protection Agency for years over how to clean 300,000 gallons of industrial waste at the Tremont City landfill.

Now, The EPA is sending a third party to address their concerns.

Beavercreeksfinest.com

A federal court has issued a decision in a decades-old case about Lammers Barrel Factory, a pollution site in Beavercreek. A list of thirty-seven companies have agreed to clean up the vacant lot, which was contaminated sometime in the 1950s or 1960s with volatile organic compounds, which can be toxic if consumed through drinking water or vapor intrusion.

EPA Begins Toxic Vapor Sampling In Riverside

Dec 18, 2013
A map from the EPA shows the boundaries of the current investigation in Riverside: Hypathia Avenue on the east, Rohrer Boulevard on the west, Guernsey Dell and Minnesota Avenues on the north and Valley Pike Street on the south.
USEPA Region V

    

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has started testing dozens of homes in the north Dayton suburb of Riverside for dangerous airborne pollution. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are toxic industrial degreasers that were used with little regulation until the 1970s, when people began to suspect links to cancer.

Ohio EPA Water Chief Resigns

Aug 20, 2013

The official in charge of protecting Ohio’s streams and lakes has been asked to step down. In a resignation letter sent Monday the head of the Ohio EPA’s Division of Surface Water thanked employees for acting appropriately despite pressure from the coal industry to grant permits.

A letter from the state Environmental Protection Agency clears the way for a southwest Ohio university to take over a cleaned-up brownfield site now used for emergency response training.

The Dayton Daily News reports the letter to the city of Fairborn indicates no more cleanup is needed at the site housing the National Center for Medical Readiness, known as "Calamityville."

Some environmentalists are asking the federal Environmental Protection Agency to do a full audit and investigation of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, the state agency that grants permits for injection and extraction wells. Brian Rothenberg of Progress Ohio says the state agency is not doing due diligence in regulating those wells in Ohio.

Heather McLaughlin / Flickr

COLUMBUS, Ohio - State officials and advocates say available funding limits how much testing is done to identify Ohio lake pollution and problems in several areas.

The Columbus Dispatch reports the amount spent on testing is less than $200,000 a year.

The Environmental Protection Agency has about $80,000 for testing annually. Officials at the Ohio Department of Natural Resources say they spent nearly that much last year to test for toxic blue-green algae at 20 areas, including the troubled Grand Lake St. Marys between Dayton and Toledo.

Pages