WYSO

Election 2016

Karen Kasler

Among the tens of millions of people watching last night’s first presidential debate were dozens of volunteers and supporters in central Ohio, at gatherings put together by the Clinton and Trump campaigns. 

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate Monday night.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

Follow highlights of the debate in NPR's updating news story at npr.org

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Several students at Wright State University are in New York today to attend the first presidential debate.

After the university backed out of hosting the debate in July, the replacement school, Hofstra University, offered 15 tickets to Wright State students.

Rebecca Brinkman, a nursing student, got one of them, "I won the golden ticket.”

Wright State selected each student through a lottery system. Their trips are donor-funded.

All eyes are on the upcoming presidential election, but in this week's Politics Ohio we've got more of a local focus. The League of Women Voters of the Greater Dayton Area has several initiatives underway in the next few weeks to help voters get informed. Today we hear from Ana Crawford, Programs Director, with the league to talk about those initiatives.

Upcoming Events provided by LWV:

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted
Statehouse News Bureau

An effort to recruit poll workers is underway throughout the state.

Secretary of State Jon Husted is facing down big numbers in this election.

“We need over 35,000 poll workers at nearly 9,000 precinct locations across Ohio.”

Husted says he has no doubt they will get to that number, but he says it’s important to get people who can deal with technology, are properly trained and possess good attitudes. He thinks it’s possible to get all of the poll workers needed, along with some alternates, by working with businesses who encourage their employees to participate.

Dan Gummel

Springfield wants to temporarily increase taxes by point four percent. If approved by voters, the five-year levy would generate 6.5 million dollars annually.

That’s money City Manager Jim Bodenmiller says is critically needed, “This issue is about three things, safety, streets and it’s about jobs.”

If the levy does not pass, the city will be forced to close a fire station, cut ten police officers and reduce funding to parks and recreation, and Bodenmiller says the city will have fully depleted its reserve funds by the end of 2017.

Juliet Fromholt

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a decision by the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals on Ohio’s early voting laws.

 

The Ohio Democratic Party had sued Ohio Secretary of State John Husted after the elimination of what was known as “golden week” when Ohioans could both register and cast ballots at the same time.

 

On Tuesday, following the decision, Secretary Husted issued a statement saying Ohio remains one of the “easiest states in the nation in which to register and cast your ballot.”

 

April Laissle

Democratic Presidential Nominee Hillary Clinton’s health became a focal point during running mate Tim Kaine’s visit to Dayton today.

The major topic of the rally at Stivers School for the Arts was college affordability, but the tone of the event shifted slightly during Former Governor Ted Strickland’s introduction speech.  

“Just let me say that I’ve known Senator Kaine for quite some time. He is a wonderfully prepared person to be the Vice President and to be the President, if that ever became necessary.” 

Andy Chow

A major national Democratic political group is canceling more ad spending in the Ohio Senate race as the state's former governor lags his well-funded Republican opponent.

Democratic ex-Gov. Ted Strickland was once considered among his party's best chances this year to unseat a sitting Republican, Sen. Rob Portman. But Strickland's campaign has failed to gain traction.

The Senate Majority PAC, Strickland's single largest source of outside support, is now canceling an additional three weeks of broadcast buys from Sept. 20 to Oct. 10. The ad buys totaled about $3 million.

Nick Castele/ideastream

The Democratic and Republican presidential nominees both made stops in Northeast Ohio on Labor Day with their running mates. Hillary Clinton held a rally in Cleveland, and Donald Trump spoke at a roundtable in Brook Park. 

Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine took the stage at Luke Easter Park on Cleveland’s east side Monday afternoon.

Clinton criticized Donald Trump throughout their remarks, speaking in a hoarse voice after a bout of coughing.

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