WYSO

Drugs

Naloxone
www.drugs.com

Accidental drug overdose deaths have decreased in Montgomery County over the past few months, according to a new report from the Community Overdose Action Team task force. But, that doesn’t necessarily mean fewer people are grappling with drug addiction, officials say.

The number of Montgomery County overdose deaths fell by more than half between May and August of this year, from 80 to 38 per month.  

Pic from right: Gail Dafler, prevention specialist Goodwill Easter Seals Miami Valley (GWESMV); Dawn Cooksey, director of Behavioral Health Services GWESMV;   Helen Jones-Kelley, executive director, Montgomery County Alcohol, Drug Addiction & Mental Healt
ADAMHS

Officials with Montgomery County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) say around 75 percent of people addicted to opioids first became hooked through a doctor’s prescription.

 

That high percentage prompted ADAMHS, Kroger pharmacies and Goodwill Easter Seals to collaborate on a new effort to distribute free drug-disposal bags.

 

Officials say the bags offer a safe, cost-effective and environmentally responsible solution to eliminate unwanted opioid prescription drugs.

Flickr Creative Commons User Reneek_

The Cincinnati City Council has approved funding in the city's 2018 budget for a needle exchange program aimed at stopping the spread of HIV and hepatitis C by intravenous drug users. 

  The council voted last week to provide $150,000 to the program based at the University of Cincinnati. City money will pay for at least four mobile sites served by a van.

The program had been funded by a 20-county nonprofit health agency called Interact for Health. A Cincinnati councilman began pushing for city funding of the needle exchange program after grant money dried up.

Naloxone
www.drugs.com

The state pharmacy board says two-thirds of Ohio's retail pharmacies now offer the drug overdose antidote naloxone without a prescription.

Giant Eagle and Rite Aid stores were recently added to the list, increasing the number to 1,374 pharmacies in 84 of Ohio's 88 counties. The counties not represented are Holmes, Morgan, Noble and Vinton counties.

History Talk: Hooked - Drugs, Prohibition, and American Cities

Oct 17, 2016

Since the 1970s, the "War on Drugs" has absorbed billions of dollars, fueled armed interventions overseas, imprisoned millions of individuals, and stigmatized inner city communities--all without appearing to have produced a measurable impact on actual drug use.

The mother and grandmother of a teen who died from a heroin overdose at an Ohio hotel are scheduled to be sentenced for giving the 16-year-old the drugs that killed him.

Prosecutors say the grandmother delivered the drugs that her daughter and a friend used with the teen at a hotel in suburban Akron.

Investigators say Andrew Frye was found dead last April in a chair inside the hotel room that was littered with syringes and drug paraphernalia.

Tom Kavana/Flickr Creative Commons

The head of a Cincinnati-area drug task force is calling on the state to declare a public health emergency to free up more resources for fighting heroin.

After a recent spike of overdoses, Newtown Police Chief Tom Synan, who heads the task force, is calling the situation a public health crisis. 

Police in Cincinnati are asking for the public's help in finding the source of the suspected heroin behind an estimated 78 overdoses in just two days this week.

Authorities believe the same batch is linked to three recent deaths.

They say there were an estimated 78 overdoses on Tuesday and Wednesday and a total of 174 overdoses in emergency rooms within the past week.

Local officials are calling it a public health emergency.

Thomas Marthinsen

Drug overdose deaths are still on the rise in Montgomery County according to first quarter 2016 numbers.

The Montgomery County Poisoning Death Review tracks and analyzes unintentional drug overdose deaths. According to its report, early 2016 saw a 130% increase in the number of drug overdose deaths in the County compared to the first quarter of 2015.

The report indicates a 26% increase in deaths from illicit Fentanyl in the community. 

Ohio troopers say they seized about seven times as much heroin during the first half of 2016 as they did during the same period last year.

The State Highway Patrol attributes the increase at least in part to several large drug busts.

The rise comes amid other signs that Ohio's opiate problems continue to grow. The Cleveland area saw 15 overdose deaths in a recent three-day span that were attributed to heroin, the synthetic opiate fentanyl or a combination of those.

Customs officials in Cincinnati seized 10 pounds of heroin in one summer shipment.

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