Disabilities

In 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare (CMS) mandated that all County Boards of Developmental Disabilities cease adult day services by 2019.  In Montgomery County alone, that directive impacts more than 630 adults with disabilities. 

The directive puts a burden on some community agencies that are providing adult daycare who will now have to increase the number of people they serve.

To find out how one of those agencies is preparing for the increase, WYSO’s Jerry Kenney spoke to Dennis Grant – executive director of United Rehabilitation Services of Greater Dayton. 

4 Paws for Ability
Jerry Kenney

4 Paws For Ability provides highly trained service dogs to children and veterans with disabilities.  They’ve been providing them since 1998—the organization began in Cincinnati but is now located in Xenia.

Kelly Camm is the development director of the organization. In this interview, with WYSO's Jerry Kenney, she explains how 4 Paws is unique because they don't operate under any age or geographic restrictions.

A $4 million deficit and the loss of $2 million in state funding over the past two years has the Clark County Board of Developmental Disabilities streamlining its operations in 2016.

Voters in Clark County have turned down the last two levy requests from the Clark County Board of Developmental Disabilities. Now, Superintendent Jennifer Rousculp-Miller stated the agency will have to cut services in Clark County.

Jeff Hiles / WYSO

College students are surrounded by technology inside and outside of the classroom. And increasingly educators are reaching learners through smart phones and laptops.

John Dixon works at  Access Dayton, one of the groups leading the push to move the stop. He says if he can't get a ride, a trip to the mall can take hours.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Local groups will recognize the 25th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act or ADA this weekend with a protest. Activists say the Greater Dayton RTA bus stop at the Dayton Mall discriminates against people with disabilities.

The ADA is a federal law that’s led to a lot of the accommodations we’re used to today, like curb ramps and braille on elevators, but leaders with Access Dayton and Leaders for Equality and Action Dayton (LEAD) say the bus stop at the Dayton Mall violates the spirit of that law.

Jerry Kenney/WYSO

Goodwill Easter Seals Miami Valley (GESMV) says more than 300 people attended the ribbon-cutting for a large new facility on South Main Street Tuesday morning.

Marketing Coordinator Kim Bramlage says Goodwill had long outgrown the Kuntz Road building where the organization has been centered the last 30 years.

User: thoth188 / Creative Commons

Jennifer Helton’s son, Matthew, has multiple disabilities. Caring for him can be challenging—and it got more challenging about 10 years ago, when he outgrew the infant changing stations at many public facilities.

"When we're out, if he needs changed I have to do it on the floor of our van, kind of out there in the open," said Helton. "And the bigger he gets the harder it is to do that and that limits us in where we can go and what we can do.”

The Clark County Board of Developmental Disabilities 8-year additional levy was defeated Tuesday. Unofficial results show that 12,811 voters approved, while 14,560 said "no" to passing the measure. 

Until November 2012, the board hadn't had a levy defeat since 1967. With two straight losses now, Board Superintendent Jennifer Rousculp says her agency won't be able to do as much for the developmentally disabled in Clark County.

Issue 25 Fails

Nov 7, 2012

Clark County voters did not approve Issue 25 yesterday. The Developmental Disabilities Board there was seeking approval of a new, 1.75 million, eight year levy. WYSO's Wayne Baker reports that the issue failed by more than 1,100 votes.

According to unofficial results with 100 percent of the precincts reporting, Issue 25 failed by a count of 51 to 49 percent. More than 30,000 voters were against the measure and 29,000 voted to approve it.

Polling sites in 20 counties will get permanent upgrades to assist Ohio voters with disabilities under newly released federal grant money.

Secretary of State Jon Husted said Tuesday that about $100,000 in grants will go to county boards of elections to improve access for voters with disabilities.

The funds were made available by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through the Help America Vote Act.  Individual grant amounts range from $40 to $15,000 for improvements in 92 precincts.

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