WYSO

Disabilities

40-year-old Heather Reese and her mother, Sue, in Dayton.
Basim Blunt / WYSO

In this latest installment from our summer series Just Ask: Talking About Disability, WYSO's April Laissle introduces us to 40-year-old Heather Reese, who has Down syndrome, a heart defect known as mitral regurgitation, or MR, and a visual impairment. Heather leads Laissle on a tour of United Rehabilitation Services in Dayton, where she works. And we meet Heather’s mom, Sue, who also works at URS.

Some highlights from this story include:

Just Ask: Susan Koller And Tom Webb Talk Job Discrimination

Aug 17, 2017
People with disabilities say many work environments aren’t set up to accommodate disabilities. This is an additional challenge for people with mobility issues in the workplace, who often need special software or other assistive technology.
Basim Blunt / WYSO

In this installment from our series Just Ask: Talking About Disability,  we explore the issue of employment discrimination and access. WYSO producer Anna Lurie introduces us to Susan Koller and Tom Webb, who both have cerebral palsy. They say many work environments aren’t set up to accommodate people with disabilities. And many people with mobility issues in the workplace also need special software or other assistive technology.

Unemployment Rate For People Age 16 to 64, with and without disabilities
National Center for Family & Demographic Research, Bowling Green State University / WYSO

All this month, WYSO is bringing you stories of Ohioans living with disabilities. It’s a series we’re calling Just Ask: Talking About Disability. In an effort to better understand the issue of disabilities in Ohio, we collaborated with researchers from the National Center for Family and Demographic Research at Bowling Green State University, who analyzed statistics from the 2015 five-year American Community Survey.

Robert Sabwami, 41, tells us about his experience growing up in Kenya with a visual impairment.
Basim Blunt / WYSO

In this installment from our series Just Ask: Talking About Disability, we hear from 41-year-old Robert Sabwami, who recalls his experience growing up in Kenya with a visual impairment. 

In this story produced by WYSO's April Laissle, he says his journey hasn’t always been easy. When Robert first started losing his vision, he was plunged into isolation.

Highlights from this interview include: 

Michaela Feeser
Basim Blunt / WYSO

In this installment from our series Just Ask: Talking About Disability, we explore the topic of caregiving. Many people with disabilities in the Miami Valley rely on aides, who help with day-to-day tasks. 

Here, WYSO producer April Laissle introduces us to 24-year-old Michaela Feeser from Dayton, who has cerebral palsy. She explains what it feels like to clash with an aide you depend on everyday. 

Highlights from this interview include:  

President George H.W. Bush Signs The Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990.
Wikimedia, Public Domain / WYSO

This Wednesday marks the 27th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The federal law mandates equal access, and prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities nationwide.

Advocate Linda Wetters is former assistant director of the state agency Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, previously known as the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission.  

Todd Corthell and Lateef Brown
Basim Blunt / WYSO

Lateef Brown and Todd Corthell both suffered a traumatic brain injury in their twenties, and both are still grappling with recovery, decades later. In this audio story from our series, Just Ask: Talking About Disability, Lateef and Todd share their personal recovery journeys, and talk about how their lives have changed since their injuries. 

Highlights from this interview include: 

Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities Services

The Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities Services is taking steps to sell 4 of its facilities.

The Board is looking to find new owners for its Calumet, Jergens, Kuntz and Liberty centers. Each facility provides a variety of services to people with developmental disabilities.

The move was prompted by new guidelines from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Under the new rules, by 2024, county boards will no longer be allowed to both provide services to people on federal waivers and manage their cases.

In 2014, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare (CMS) mandated that all County Boards of Developmental Disabilities cease adult day services by 2019.  In Montgomery County alone, that directive impacts more than 630 adults with disabilities. 

The directive puts a burden on some community agencies that are providing adult daycare who will now have to increase the number of people they serve.

To find out how one of those agencies is preparing for the increase, WYSO’s Jerry Kenney spoke to Dennis Grant – executive director of United Rehabilitation Services of Greater Dayton. 

4 Paws for Ability
Jerry Kenney

4 Paws For Ability provides highly trained service dogs to children and veterans with disabilities.  They’ve been providing them since 1998—the organization began in Cincinnati but is now located in Xenia.

Kelly Camm is the development director of the organization. In this interview, with WYSO's Jerry Kenney, she explains how 4 Paws is unique because they don't operate under any age or geographic restrictions.

Pages