WYSO

Dayton RTA

A trolley bus parked at RTA headquarters in Dayton.
Pat O'Malley, RTA

Crowds gathered at Wright Stop Plaza in downtown Dayton Tuesday morning to voice their feedback on a series of proposed Greater Dayton RTA service changes and fare hikes. Many people at the meeting worried the proposed changes may make it more difficult to get to work and school. 

Greater Dayton RTA
Greater Dayton RTA / Greater Dayton RTA

Disability rights advocates are encouraging people to speak out about proposed Greater Dayton RTA service changes. The transit agency is proposing fare hikes, route changes and eliminations to make up for a more than $4 million budget gap next year.

The RTA has lost a significant chunk of funding from the state since July, 2017. To make up for the shortfall, agency officials are considering a series of changes that would begin in February.

From left to right, City Manager, Shelley Dickstein; DDP President, Sandy Gudorf; Tracy Sibbing with United Way; and Montgomery County Commissioner, Dan Foley.
WYSO/ Jerry Kenney

Dayton officials Tuesday launched a new collaborative effort aimed at reducing the number of panhandlers in the city. The new Real Change Dayton (RCD) program encourages people to help the homeless by giving at designated locations instead of giving directly to panhandlers.

A trolley bus parked at RTA headquarters in Dayton.
Pat O'Malley, RTA

As RTA drivers and mechanics prepare to return to work Friday, the Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority is offering riders a “pay what you want” fare through the end of the month.

Jess Mador/WYSO

The strike by Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority drivers and mechanics continued into a second day, Tuesday. School officials are working on contingency plans to help transport students to and from school safely. The RTA system came to a halt early Monday morning after talks between the union and RTA management stalled.

Greater Dayton RTA
Greater Dayton RTA / Greater Dayton RTA

RTA bus drivers and mechanics walked out Monday morning, following the breakdown of negotiations between their union and RTA management over the weekend.

Leaders of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1385 and RTA executives spent hours Sunday attempting to settle on terms of a new contract, but both parties walked away without an agreement.

 

Union leaders say the dispute centers on wage and insurance issues.

A trolley bus parked at RTA headquarters in Dayton.
Pat O'Malley, RTA

Greater Dayton RTA Bus drivers and mechanics are set to strike on Monday, unless their union can come to an agreement with management before a midnight Sunday deadline.

Members of the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1385 and RTA executives have failed to agree on the terms of a new contract since the expiration of their previous contract back in 2015.  Union representatives say the dispute centers on insurance and wage increase issues.

A trolley bus parked at RTA headquarters in Dayton.
Pat O'Malley, RTA

Dayton is one of only five US cities that still have electric trolley buses. Listener Aaron Hill had several questions about the trolleys: he wondered about their history, their cost compared to diesel buses, and the future of the trolley system. I drove down to RTA headquarters in Dayton and sat down with two veteran employees to find the answers to our curious listener’s multiple-part question.

How did Dayton get its trolleys?

 

Local Groups File Lawsuit Against Dayton Mall

Dec 15, 2015
Dayton Mall
Edoderoo / Flickr Creative Commons

Two local organizations have filed a lawsuit in federal court saying the Dayton Mall’s bus stop discriminates against people with disabilities.

Advocates for Basic Legal Equality, or ABLE, joined with Disability Rights Ohio in a suit filed Tuesday. They say the public RTA bus stop at the mall is unreasonably far from the mall’s main entrance, creating barriers for people with disabilities who work or shop at the mall.

Jason Boylan is an attorney for Disability Rights Ohio. He says the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was intended to prevent situations like this.

The Market at Wright Stop Plaza is open inside the bus station Tues.-Thurs. from 12 p.m.-6 p.m. food desert rta bus dayton
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

As many as 18 million people in the U.S. live in a food desert—defined by the USDA as a low-income area with limited access to a grocery store. Around one in five Dayton residents are low-income people living in food desert areas, and a significant number also lack access to a vehicle.

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