Dayton Public Schools

The new superintendent of Dayton Public Schools is moving forward with plans to cut administrative staff. Superintendent Rhonda Corr says the cuts are due to enrollment numbers in the district – they’re declining.


Data from the Ohio Department of Education shows student attendance has dropped by about 3,000 students over the last nine years. Corr says there are not enough students to justify the number of people on the payroll.


Dayton school officials want feedback and ideas from parents about ways to improve the district.

This year’s release of school report cards brought good news to Dayton Public Schools.

The report revealed the district will avoid a 2018 takeover by the state’s academic distress commission. That’s because for the first time ever,  it earned an A rating in the value-added category, which measures student progress.

DPS was on track for takeover because it scored F’s in both that category and in overall performance for 3 straight years.

The Dayton School Board has shelved plans to put a new levy on the fall ballot.

The 5-mill levy was supposed to pay for afterschool programs and preschool for all 4 year olds in Dayton.  Plans changed after the City of Dayton decided to put its own levy on the ballot - one that would also cover universal preschool, among other things.

Fresh vegetable cups prepared for the National School Lunch Program.
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr Creative Commons

About 54-percent of Montgomery County students receive free and reduced-price lunches each school year. But, during the summer, access to a healthy meal can become more difficult.


The Summer Food Service program at Dayton Public Schools has been running since 1968,  according to Director of Nutrition Services, Cathie DeFehr.

“During the summer they don’t have the school to come to,” she said.

Dayton Public Schools
April Laissle

Rhonda Corr, the new superintendent of Dayton Public Schools (DPS) met with parents and community members yesterday at Central State University.

Corr spoke to group of about 40 people about how she plans to turn around the failing district.

In the speech, she said one her first items of business will be tackling third grade literacy -- Dayton Public Schools has one of the lowest rates in the State.

April Laissle

Rhonda Corr has been named the new superintendent of Dayton Public Schools.

Corr previously worked as an area superintendent in Chicago and Indianapolis Public Schools. She began her career as a Spanish teacher in Cleveland.

“Look at the data: our kids are not learning," said Corr in last week's public forum with DPS parents. "I am here because I have done the work in Chicago. I walked into Chicago and we turned around the schools quickly”

April Laissle

More than 200 parents and Dayton community members packed into the auditorium at River's Edge Montessori School for the chance to meet and interview the 3 finalists for Dayton Public Schools Superintendent.

The School Board narrowed their candidate pool down to Rhonda Corr, a former area superintendent in Indianapolis and Chicago, Gregory Roberson, an ex-military sergeant and Chief of the Office for Exceptional Children at Dayton Public Schools, and Daniel Schroer, the superintendent of Margaretta Local Schools in Castalia, Ohio.

Dayton school officials want feedback and ideas from parents about ways to improve the district.

Dayton Public Schools hosted a town hall meeting last night at the Dayton Boys Preparatory school, just weeks after announcing the departure of Superintendent Lori Ward.

Ward spent the meeting, which was held in partnership with the NAACP, outlining how the district ended up at risk of a state takeover, and how they plan to recover.

“We went through 3 years of almost 150 teachers leaving the district," Ward said to the crowd. "So strategy: all buildings will be staffed with effective teachers and provided high quality on-going professional development.”

Dayton school officials want feedback and ideas from parents about ways to improve the district.

Lori Ward is stepping down from her position as superintendent of Dayton Public Schools.

The school board decided not to renew the contracts of both Ward and treasurer Craig Jones in February. That move opened the doors to contract negotiations. Yesterday, the district announced they were unable to agree on new terms with Ward, who has served as superintendent since 2010. Since then, graduation rates have gone up, but the district’s performance on state tests has not improved.


Joanne Viskup

For some high school kids, figuring out a plan after senior years is as simple as apply to college and go, or start looking for a job.

But plenty of teenagers are facing issues a lot of adults would struggle with, financial and family pressures that make just getting to graduation tough—let alone, looking ahead.