WYSO

Dayton Police Department

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

The Dayton chapter of the NAACP has launched an effort to remove the City of Dayton's recently reactivated traffic cameras.

Group members allege the cameras unfairly target vulnerable communities in the Miami Valley.

The organization is aiming to collect 5,000 signatures on a petition to put the issue on the November ballot.

NAACP President Derrick Foward says the cameras disproportionately affect poor residents.

Activists protest Dayton's pedestrian safety ordinance at city commission meeting held May 23.
April Laissle / WYSO

The Dayton City Commission recently passed a law effectively banning panhandling along 51 major roadways. It’s not the first time the city has passed laws curbing the practice. Now, some legal advocates are already raising questions about the city’s new pedestrian safety ordinance.

At the May 23 city commission meeting, Mayor Nan Whaley was clear: the ordinance is not about panhandling.

“Nothing in this ordinance criminalizes holding a sign on the side of a roadway,” the mayor said.

City of Dayton

Crime rates have fallen significantly in Dayton this year, according to the latest city data. The city’s drop in crime lines up with larger national trends showing overall crime rates at historic lows in many cities.

 

 

The data show Dayton’s crime rate fell by double digits in many areas:  

 

Violent crimes, including murder, armed robbery and aggravated assault, are down 15 percent for 2017. Property crimes, such as arson, residential burglary and theft are down 18 percent.

 

Red Light, Speed Cameras To Operate 24/7 in Dayton

Sep 6, 2017
traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Dayton officials are moving forward with plans to re-install red light cameras in the city, after a recent Ohio Supreme Court decision lifted tough state restrictions.

Red light and speed cameras will soon operate at five heavily trafficked intersections in Dayton. The city’s camera program has been shuttered since 2015, when state lawmakers enacted new usage regulations.

City of Dayton

Police K-9 units around the country have had to switch gears when it comes to using drug-sniffing dogs. That’s because powerful, synthetic opioids like fentanyl and carfentanyl are proving harmful to police officers and police dogs alike.

A woman is dead following a shooting involving three Dayton Police Officers.

 

A statement released by the Dayton Police Department stated officers were responding to a domestic violence call at 12:15 Sunday morning when they encountered 35-year-old Kisha Arrone.  Police say Arrone was armed and threatening to kill her partner.

Police found Arrone driving a pickup truck on Wexford Avenue and directed her to stop the vehicle. When she refused, officers set up spike strips to puncture the truck’s tires.

 

Dayton Sees Support For Body Camera Program

Sep 23, 2015
Local police departments are taking steps toward equipping officers with body cameras.
User: Scott Davidson / Flickr/Creative Commons

The Dayton Police Department has received positive feedback from a survey asking about using body cameras for its officers.

 

City officials say 1,452 people responded and 845 of those lived in Dayton proper. Overwhelmingly, residents said they would feel safer if officers were wearing cameras and they also said it was acceptable to be video recorded by police.

 

Dayton police are asking for the public to comment on the department’s decision to purchase body cameras for its officers.

The Dayton Daily News reports an online survey went live this week and will be open for Dayton residents until July 31. Questions ask about people’s feelings about police, interactions with the community, ways they think body cameras would help officers and when and where they should be used.

Dr. Kimberly Barrett (left) and Dr. Joann Wright Mawasha organized the forum at Wright State along with Dayton Police.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

About fifty people attended a forum on race and policing at Wright State Tuesday evening intended to move community members from dialogue to action around racial bias and police.

“There’s a difficult and torturous history of race and policing in this country,” said Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl, who helped facilitate. “That history is not over. We’re still living it.”

The Dayton Mediation Center and two Dayton police officers want to help ease tensions following reports of white officers shooting unarmed black people in recent months, including the nearby shooting of John Crawford III at the Beavercreek Walmart.

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