budget

Vapor Shop employee John Talmage talks to customers. The price of the liquid nicotine used for e-cigarettes could triple under Gov. Kasich's budget proposal.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. John Kasich’s budget calls for a 23 percent income tax cut. He’s proposing to pay for it with a package of tax increases, including hiking the tax on tobacco products. But at least one segment of that industry says hundreds of businesses could be snuffed out by the plan.

The budget includes $1 per pack increase in the tax on cigarettes, and would raise taxes on other tobacco products as well, says budget director Tim Keen. 

“The proposal is generally to equalize the tax treatment of cigarette, tobacco and related products,” he said.

Group Asking Kasich To Focus On College Student Debt

Feb 26, 2015

In his State of the State address, Gov. John Kasich made another big push for his budget plan, which includes policies directed at higher education. But at least one group says the plan doesn’t do enough for college students.

Kasich’s budget plan includes a cap and freeze on tuition increases. But the group “Young Invincibles” believes that will only shift more of the burden onto the students in the long run.

Gov. John Kasich recently announced his $72.3 billion dollar, two-year budget. It includes a series of tax cuts and increases as well as a change in the education funding formula.
ohio.gov

Activists, lobbyists and other budget watchers are still tearing into Gov. John Kasich’s third two-year spending plan, trying to figure out who will be helped by it, and who it will hurt. Some Ohio Statehouse veterans have very different opinions on the budget’s overall impact.

The $5.7 billion in tax cuts and benefits in the spending plan are paid for with $5.2 billion in tax increases on oil and gas drillers, on cigarettes, on businesses through the commercial activity tax, and through a half-percent increase in the state sales tax.

Kasich Wants To Use Cigarette Tax To Pay For Income Tax Cuts

Feb 6, 2015
Gov. John Kasich wants to boost the tax on a pack of cigarettes to help fund his proposed budget.
Creative Commons

Gov. John Kasich has included a cigarette tax as part of his proposed budget. Some health experts believe this will go a long way to getting people to quit.

The governor’s proposal would tack another dollar onto the existing $1.25 tax that already comes with every pack of cigarettes. That’s higher than the hike Kasich pitched last year, which was 60 cents.

Kasich Receives Mixed Reaction For Severance Tax Proposal

Feb 4, 2015
Ohio Statehouse News Bureau

House leaders are looking over Gov. John Kasich’s budget proposal which includes a big swing of the bat when it comes to a tax increase on oil and gas drilling. But the industry is ready to fight the plan.

Kasich is trying again to raise the so-called severance tax, this time proposing to move it to 6.5 percent, which he says would raise $325 million. 

Shawn Bennett with the Ohio Oil and Gas Association says the industry is already hurting because of a drop in prices. He claims a higher tax rate will further discourage investment. 

Office of Governor John Kasich

Today’s the day Gov. John Kasich unveils his third budget, which is expected to include $500 million in tax cuts plus benefits to lower-income Ohioans. But he has yet to talk about how he’ll pay for those.

Kasich wants to cut taxes on many small businesses and increase some tax benefits for lower-income Ohioans. And he’ll likely pay for those plans with a proposal to hike the tax on oil and natural gas drillers. But Kasich also suggested in December that he’ll take another swing at an increase in the tobacco tax.

Dayton school officials want feedback and ideas from parents about ways to improve the district.
facebook.com/DaytonPublicSchools

About 100 people attended a town hall meeting last night to talk about the Dayton Public School District. At first glance, DPS students aren’t doing as well as other districts in the area.

 

The Ohio Department of Education put some Dayton schools toward the bottom of the list in 3rd grade reading assessments. Only 72 percent of students are graduating and kids aren’t progressing like they should between 4th and 8th grade. Dayton Public Schools have gotten Ds and Fs in its report card from the state.

The Music Center at the Heights is expected to open in the spring.
Huber Heights City Website

The city of Huber Heights is getting closer to finalizing its spending plan for next year. This will be the first year officials craft an operating budget for the new music center. 

 

Dayton city officials are searching for a new city manager. Current manager Tim Riordan announced his resignation this fall.
City of Dayton Website: Jim Witmer/Dayton Daily News

Dayton is searching for a new city manager, and taking public input this month on what residents want from a manager. This job, unlike the mayor, isn’t an elected position.

So what exactly does a city manager do?

Current manager Tim Riordan is basically Dayton’s chief executive. Elected officials—mainly the city commissioners—mull over proposals, pass them and then task Riordan with actually carrying them out. But he also lobbies lawmakers in the statehouse and takes part in union negotiations. And he says that’s not all.

 

Dayton's officials are coming up against some unknowns in the budget process for next year.
Derek Jensen

The City of Dayton is starting its budget process for next year. Officials will be dipping into savings again to balance the spending plan.

 

It will cost about $160 million to run Dayton in 2015. That money comes from a variety of sources: income taxes, property taxes and casino revenue. But this year the city will also use $2.5 million in reserves.

Pages