WYSO

Books - Non-Fiction

Professional forecasters have wonderful jobs, don't they? Weather forecasters can be completely wrong about the weather and they still get to keep their jobs. Political pundits and pollsters can be absolutely wrong about the outcomes of elections and they will be back the next day with more polls and predictions. Nice work, right?

"Two Paths - America Divided or United" by John Kasich

Last year our Ohio Governor John Kasich mounted an unsuccessful campaign to try to secure the nomination to become his party's candidate in our 2016 presidential election. The political neophyte and outsider candidate Donald Trump steamrolled his opposition and went on to win the race for the presidency. Throughout the GOP primaries John Kasich distinguished himself as a voice of reason during candidate debates.

Paul Dickson is one of the most prolific writers I know. He has written over sixty books. His most recent one, "Leo Durocher - Baseball's Prodigal Son," is the biography of one of the most colorful and controversial baseball personalities of the 20th century.

The last time A. Scott Berg appeared on this program he discussed his monumental biography of Woodrow Wilson. On April 2, 1917 President Woodrow Wilson officially reversed course when he gave a speech to a joint session of Congress in which he stated his reasons for asking that the United States should officially declare war on Germany and finally enter World War I. The Great War had begun in 1914 and during his first term Wilson had taken pride in keeping our country out of that conflict.
 

Brian Alexander is a writer who is based in San Diego. He grew up in Lancaster, Ohio. Alexander had been considering his next book project when he paid a visit to his old hometown. He was astonished to discover that this once thriving community had fallen on hard times. The manufacturing base in Lancaster has been in decline for some time. Alexander realized that his next book project should to be an investigation of what happened to this sweet little town.
 

Have you ever heard of Mrs. Sherlock Holmes? I had not either. I had always assumed that our fictional sleuth was a devoted bachelor. Well, back in the early years of the 20th century there was a real living person who acquired the nickname "Mrs. Sherlock Holmes." Her name was Grace Humiston and she lived in New York City, not London.
 

Peter Hook returned to the program to discuss his latest music memoir. Some listeners will recall that Peter joined us a few years ago to talk about his Joy Division book. After Joy Division's vocalist Ian Curtis killed himself 37 years ago the band reformed as the New Order and Peter Hook carried on as their bassist for many years. New Order enjoyed great commercial success but as Peter relates in this new book their fame came with a heavy cost.

We have had some famous astronauts on the program. John Glenn made an appearance that became the longest interview in the history of the Book Nook. It ran over an hour. I rolled over NPR's news headlines at the top of the hour because I was still talking to John on the telephone and it was a live interview!
 

Nobody had ever done this before. Julie Zickefoose spent years drawing pictures of baby birds from life. She studied these tiny creatures as they developed in the nest. Each day she would create new portraits of these delicate nestlings. Her paintings of birds are magnificently rendered.
 

Many years ago I was spending a quiet Saturday afternoon inside a music listening room at my high school. There were shelves jammed with old record albums in there along with a turntable and a set of headphones. For a young music buff who was just discovering jazz that was my version of heaven.
 

Pages