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Aviation

Char Daston / WYSO

Have you ever noticed the blue helicopters in the sky above the Miami Valley? Those are CareFlights, air ambulances from the Miami Valley Hospital. Rocky Blazer, a listener from Springfield, says they seem to fly out a lot, and asked why the hospital would decide to send out a CareFlight, rather than a traditional ambulance. I drove down to the hospital’s central campus in Dayton to investigate.

On the helipad

In April, there was a ceremony at the Lafayette Escadrille and Flying Corps monument in France to mark the original Escadrille’s centennial
Dan Patterson

WYSO Aviation commentators Dan Patterson and Paul Glenshaw traveled to France in April to witness a significant moment in aviation history. Today they bring us the story of a milestone of American aviation—the loss of the first American pilot in combat.

One hundred years ago, on June 23, 1916, a young flyer named Victor Chapman took off on his last flight.

Dayton Air Show

The Blue Angels will be absent from this year’s Dayton Air Show. The fan favorites have decided not to perform at several air shows, including Dayton's, after last week’s tragic crash in Tennessee—losing one of their own—Marine Captain Jeff Kuss, also known as Blue Angel #6.

Roger Doctor is the Public Safety Director for the Dayton Air Show. He says the flying unit needs time before performing again.

Inserting the Solar Impulse into the mobile inflatable hangar.
Dan Patterson

Last Saturday night, the future of aviation came to Dayton, where manned flight was created. The Solar Impulse, an electrically powered aircraft, which uses solar cells to generate its power landed at Dayton International Airport on the latest leg of an attempt to circle the earth. Our aviation commentator Dan Patterson was there.

The Solar Impulse approaching Dayton International Airport, looking very much a UFO.Credit Dan PattersonEdit | Remove

An aerial view of McCook Field in Dayton
Dan Patterson Archival Collection

A story on NPR last month got our aviation commentator's attention. Dan Patterson heard that the US Navy has returned to teaching celestial navigation – a method that uses an instrument called a sextant along with the sun and stars to chart a course. The Navy says it's concerned about over-reliance on GPS navigation, which is vulnerable to attack or failure.

Dan Patterson

The Dayton Development Coalition (DDC) has announced its list of priority projects for government funding requests for the year, with some pretty futuristic Air Force research at the top of the list.

Every year the coalition brings together a committee to decide on projects to advocate for in efforts to get state and federal money into the region. The goal is to unite the region around priority projects in areas including defense, health care and transportation.

edelman.com

GE Aviation is cutting 238 engineering jobs in southwestern Ohio and 69 at other U.S. sites as it trims more than 7 percent of its engineering workforce.

Plan for a fourth building at the Air Force Museum.
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force has announced its new hangar will be opening on June 8, 2016.

The hangar, which cost almost $41 million, will house the museum’s Air Force One and an XB-70 Valkyrie, allowing visitors to see these planes without taking a shuttle. Sections of the new building will also be dedicated to space travel, research and education.

According to a press release from the museum, the privately-funded project has been under construction for more than a year and new displays are being moved in now.

 

Remembering The Wright Company's Star Exhibition Pilot

Dec 28, 2015
Rich and James French Collection

There’s a headstone in a Cape Cod cemetery that features a Wright Flyer. It’s the grave of James Clifford Turpin, a Dayton native who was once a star pilot of the Wright Company’s Exhibition Team. Turpin and his fellow aviation pioneers helped to bring flight to the whole country—but it’s likely you’ve never heard of him and once his flying career ended, he never spoke of his adventures. Commentator Paul Glenshaw has his story.

The 'First-Flight' photograph.
Wright State University Archives

Ohio lawmakers have passed a resolution that repudiates Connecticut's claim that another aviator beat the Wright brothers as first in flight.

The measure cleared its final hurdle on Wednesday when state senators unanimously approved it. The Ohio House passed it earlier this year.

Ohio is formally responding to a 2013 Connecticut law that honored aviator Gustave Whitehead as being two years ahead of Dayton residents Orville and Wilbur Wright's 1903 flight off Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

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