Arts & Culture

Artists Frustrated With Being Put in a Black Box

Mar 2, 2015
David C. Barnett / WCPN

For the past month, local arts and cultural organizations have been busy telling stories about African American history. But, some Ohio artists and cultural leaders find Black History Month to be a double-edged sword.

Janeal Ravndal reads her poem, "Remembering the Sabbath."

With a newly revamped lineup, Ole No. 9 is moving forward into 2015 with live shows and a new album in the works.  The band visited the WYSO studios for a live set on Kaleidoscope and talked to host Juliet Fromholt about their plans, progress on the album and a special upcoming gig.

Ole No. 9 will perform on February 27th at Canal Public House with Shrub and on March 14th at the Artists' Theatre in Fairborn. 

Multi-instrumentalist Stelth Ulvang (Lumineers, Dovekins) recently released his latest solo effort, And As Always The Infinite Cosmos, and is embarking on a tour in support of the release that will bring him to the Miami Valley in early March.  Kaleidoscope host Juliet Fromholt spoke with Ulvang about performing solo as opposed to with a band, writing and recording the album and his upcoming tour.

Stelth Ulvang will perform at Canal Public House in Dayton on March 11 and Taffy's in Eaton on March 12th with Starving in the Belly of the Whale.

Maziar Bahari is a journalist, film maker and human rights activist from Iran. His work landed him in an Iranian prison for several month’s in 2009. His memoir Then They Came for Me was the basis for The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart's 2014 film Rosewater. In 2014 Bahari produced and directed the documentary film To Light a Candle about the persecution of Bahá'ís in Iran. 

To find out more about the film and its maker, WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Dr. Jim Malarky, Chair of Humanities at Antioch University. 

Celebrating Black Women Writers

Feb 26, 2015
courtesy of the Central State University Archives

In the mid to late 1970s, WYSO broadcast the voices of three remarkable black women writers, and these tapes are preserved in the WYSO Archives. The work of Maya Angelou, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Alice Walker still resonates today. Rediscovered Radio’s Jocelyn Robinson reflects on these writers and their work.

One of my first tasks as the WYSO Archives Fellow was to listen to hours of digitized historic tape in order to mine the collection for hidden jewels, like a recording of the unmistakable voice of Maya Angelou reading her poem Harlem Hopscotch.

Steve Broidy reads his poem, "Ships That Pass."

Kathy Austin reads her poem, "The Train."

This is one of the breakout novels of 2015. Here's my review which ran in the Cox Ohio newspapers:

 

In “Descent” Tim Johnston has written a literary mystery that is wrought with lovely craftiness. We can become emotionally involved and will want some of these characters to survive perils Johnston has imagined for them. It won’t be easy as outcomes remain in doubt. He takes us through baffling twists and turns.

courtesy of Dayton Performing Arts Alliance

This winter, Dayton Opera will present a production of Dead Man Walking, an opera based on the book by Sister Helen Prejean.  Stage director Gary Briggle joined WYSO Music Director Niki Dakota in the studio to talk about the production.  They were also joined by mezz-soprano Amanda Fink, baritone Zachary Gordin and Dayton opera chorus master Jeff Powell, who previewed some selections from the show.

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