Arts & Culture

Back in 1999 Mike Wallace appeared on the program to discuss the first volume of his massive history of New York City. That book ended with the year 1898. Wallace was the co-author of that work. It is a massive volume and was highly praised. The book went on to win the Pulitzer Prize.

Cathy Essinger reads her poem, "Serendipity"

Elenore + the Elephant
Gary Mitchell

As Elenore + The Elephant prepare to release their debut EP, the band visited the WYSO studios for a live set on Kaleidoscope. They talked with host Juliet Fromholt about forming the band, writing and recording the album, and more.

Elenore + the Elephant will celebrate the releaese of their EP on Thursday, December 7 at the Yellow Cab in downtown Dayton.

Songwriter Tia McGraff has spent 2017 touring in support of her latest album, Crazy Beautiful, and she'll wrap up her most recent Excursion with a performance at the Yellow Cab in downtown Dayton.  McGraff spoke with Kaleidoscope host Juliet Fromholt by phone ahead of her local appearance and talked about her experiences on the road, writing and publishing her first children's book, and more.

Tia McGraff will perform at the Yellow Cab in downtown Dayton on Sunday, December 10. Learn more at https://www.tiamcgraff.com/shows

"Righteous" by Joe Ide

Joe Ide returned to the program to talk about his second book in a series that features a fearless sleuth named I.Q. In his first book, the eponymous "I.Q.," we learned the back story of this young man who investigates crimes in a hardscrabble neighborhood in Los Angeles. He had been devoted to his older brother and after his brother was killed in a traffic accident that tragedy left the younger brother devastated and alone.

Dayton International Peace Museum

Each year the Dayton International Peace Museum holds a luncheon to honor the winner of the Nobel Peace and celebrate work toward peace in the local and international community.  Sinclair Professor of Sociology Kathy Rowell, who will serve as keynote speaker, and Kevin Kelly from the Dayton International Peace Museum joined Excursions host Niki Dakota in the WYSO studio to talk about the event.

The Dayton International Peace Museum's Nobel Peace Prize Luncheon is Saturday, December 9 at Sinclair Community College's Ponitz Center.

Try to imagine that your two young sons were out working in the tobacco field one day and that they never came home. They had vanished and you had no idea what had happened to them. This happened to a mother in Virginia over a century ago. The two missing boys had been taken away to be paraded around the country as freaks in a circus side show. In those days before television and radio the circus was the the most popular entertainment to be found in little towns and hamlets across America.

Jennifer Taylor

In the spirit of the 1972 Surrealist Ball, Dayton's Surrealist Ball combines visual and performance art, music and costumes.  Now in its third year, the local event benefits programming and adjunct faculty at Grass Roots Enrichment Center's Strong program, STRONG is a comprehensive program developed to prevent and treat the sexual victimization of young people.  Grass Roots' Lisa Patrick and actress Irene Bedard, who will contribute a performance art piece to the event, joined Kaleidoscope host Juliet Fromholt in the WYSO studios for a preview of this year's Ball. 

Stella Ling reads her poem, "Yellowing Springs"

In 1932 Franklin Delano Roosevelt began serving his first term as President of the United States of America. In the election Roosevelt had defeated the incumbent Herbert Hoover. When Hoover was elected in 1928 the U.S. economy was booming. With the stock market collapse on Black Friday in 1929 the nation had plunged into the Great Depression. The dour Hoover had become very unpopular. Roosevelt exuded confidence and he was elected even though most people had no sense of what he might try to do to get the country back on track.