Algae Treatment at Grand Lake Isn't Working

Oct 15, 2012

A two-year, $8.5 million project to stop toxic algae in Ohio's largest inland lake isn't working.
The 13,000-acre Grand Lake St. Marys in western Ohio was sprayed with aluminum sulfate in April that was supposed to keep the blue-green algae from feeding on phosphorous in the water. A similar treatment was applied last year.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that this year's treatment was spoiled by high winds that helped stir phosphorus-rich mud from the lake bottom.


The National Center for Water Quality Research says the mild winter and spring temperatures could mean toxic blue-green algae will make its appearance in western Lake Erie earlier than usual.

Dr. David Baker says the algae will show up sooner if the water heats up more quickly. Another critical factor will be rainfall and the amount of fertilizer that runs into the lake from nearby farms.

The third installment of the SOCHE Talks features Sukh Sidhu, Associate Professor in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept., Group Leader of Sustainable Environmental Technologies Group, University of Dayton. Today he talks about practical uses for algae.