Affordable Care Act

Shutdown Impacts Thousands of Ohio Workers

Oct 2, 2013

Thousands of people around Ohio are beginning to feel the effects of the federal government shutdown. Regional Social Security offices have canceled in-person appointments and the state’s national parks and forests are closed. The advocacy group, Fair Share Ohio, says 25,000 federal employees who live in Ohio stayed at home today and could not go to work.

The Federal health care Marketplace is set to open for business Tuesday, Oct. 1, and open enrollment will last for six months. Most people who can’t get employer insurance will be required to sign up for health plans under the Affordable Care Act, or pay a fee. But there’s still a lot of confusion about what exactly this will mean for the uninsured — about 1.5 million people in Ohio.

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This week the Affordable Care Act has inspired congressional faceoffs, online poetry, and a reading of "Green Eggs and Ham" on the Senate floor. Meanwhile, the federal government is scrambling to get ready for the launch of the marketplace, where Ohio’s uninsured will shop for health plans.

On October first, Ohioans can begin to look at insurance options on the new health care exchanges. The head of Ohio’s Department of Insurance predicts there will be problems but an advocate for the federal health care plan says this will open doors for more than a million Ohioans.

Portman Says He’ll Vote To Defund Affordable Care Act

Sep 13, 2013

A new energy bill and a move to defund Obamacare, those were topics of conversation in a conference call Sen. Rob Portman held with reporters on Thursday.

The House of Representatives has voted dozens of times to defund or otherwise take the wind out of the sails of the Affordable Care Act. Now, there’s talk in the Senate of doing the same.

Speaking with reporters on Thursday, Republican Sen. Rob Portman said he’d support that move.

The federal health care marketplace is set to open Oct. 1, and Ohio organizations are scrambling to prepare. Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, almost all Americans will be required to have health care either through an employer, through a private insurer, or through a state- or federally-run marketplace. The marketplaces will essentially be regulated online shopping centers where consumers can compare health plans and find out whether they qualify for federal subsidies.

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The discussion over extending Medicaid came to Dayton this week. Members of the Ohio Senate Finance Subcommittee came to CareSource to hear how Medicaid expansion would affect Ohioans and the state’s bottom line. Emily McCord speaks with WYSO's economics reporter, Lewis Wallace, who reports that health care advocates point to a study that shows Ohio can expand Medicaid while saving money at the same time.


Health Care Advocates Question Ohio’s Navigator Rules

Aug 14, 2013

In preparation for the health care exchange element of the federal Affordable Care Act, the government will designate groups as navigator to help guide people through the system. But there are non-profit groups who say an Ohio law leaves them out of the process.

Soon the federal government will announce which groups can operate as navigators in Ohio, these are people who will help answer consumer questions about the Affordable Care Act and the health plans Ohioans can choose.

A new national report says expanding Medicaid eligibility in Ohio under the Affordable Care Act would reduce the number of uninsured residents by half.

It would also cost the state an additional $3.1 billion in the next decade.

The Dayton Daily News says the numbers come from a report by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a Washington-based nonpartisan health care policy research organization.

The plan is to make Ohio Medicaid a cabinet-level agency starting halfway through the next two year budget cycle on July 1, 2014. Right now Medicaid is housed in the Department of Job and Family Services, but is also administered by five other state agencies.  Greg Moody is the head of the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation.

“We realized that the organization of the program itself was stifling innovation," says Moody.

Medicaid is a nearly $19 billion program – it’s a third of the state budget and growing. But Moody says this move isn’t designed to cut the budget.

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