Abortion

Text of Gov Kasich’s veto on Heartbeat bill
Andy Chow

Gov. John Kasich has signed one abortion ban, but vetoed another one. 

Kasich used his line-item veto power and struck down the so-called “Heartbeat Bill”, which would ban abortion at the point a fetal heartbeat could be detected. But he left the child abuse bill that ban was attached to intact.

If the Heartbeat Bill had become law, it would be the strictest abortion ban in the country, and many critics said it was unconstitutional. But Kasich signed another ban that would outlaw abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy.

Miami Valley pro-choice activists say they’re taking action after the Ohio Legislature approved a bill banning abortion at the time a fetal heartbeat is detected, which could be as early as 6 weeks into pregnancy.

If signed by Governor Kasich, the law would be among the most stringent abortion regulations in the country.

Joy Schwab of the Dayton Women’s Rights Alliance says the group is reaching out to the governor’s office to address the issue. She thinks the legislation will be challenged in court.

Jo Ingles

A bill that would ban abortion at the point a fetal heartbeat can be detected was passed late last night in the Ohio House. That vote came a few hours after it was suddenly approved in the Senate. And it got through the legislature in an unexpected way.

After years of trying to get the so-called Heartbeat Bill passed, and more than a year after it passed the House, Janet Folger Porter of Faith2Action was giddy after the Senate passed it 21 to 10.

Heartbeat
Lars P. / Flickr Creative Commons

Lawmakers in Ohio's state Senate have approved banning abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

The so-called "heartbeat bill" approved Tuesday would result in what would be one of the most stringent abortion restrictions in America.

The legislation would prohibit most abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancy after the first detectable heartbeat.

Similar measures have faced legal challenges elsewhere and detractors in Ohio fear it will lead to a costly fight in the courts. Opponents are predicting it will be found unconstitutional if it becomes law.

Abortion protestors at Ohio Statehouse recently
Jo Ingles / WYSO

A decision by the Ohio Department of Health to order a Dayton area abortion clinic to shut down is drawing criticism and praise. Abortion opponents say it’s a step in the right direction but supporters of legal abortion say it is politically motivated over-reach by a state agency.

NARAL Pro Choice Ohio’s Gabriel Mann condemns the decision by the Ohio Department of Health to revoke an operating license for a Dayton area abortion clinic, “Well, this definitely appears to be a witch hunt.”

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

State health officials have revoked the operating license of one of Ohio’s last remaining abortion providers. The state issued the order on the grounds the clinic failed to obtain a written hospital-transfer agreement. 

The Ohio Department of Health says the clinic needs another backup doctor available to admit patients in a medical emergency. Since 2013, the state’s required all abortion clinics to have such backup agreements. 

Anti-abortion groups wants disciplinary action taken against a Kettering doctor who performed an abortion on a woman suspected of being high on heroin.

 

Both Dayton and Ohio Right To Life groups have filed a complaint with the State Medical Board based on information they received from an Ohio Department of Health report. It indicates that in 2015, the Women’s Med Center in Dayton performed an abortion on a 31-year-old woman who was physically unstable and incoherent, possibly due to a mix of pain pills and heroin.

 

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

The Supreme Court’s ruling striking down a Texas abortion law may have repercussions in the Miami Valley.

The Texas law required abortion clinics to operate as ambulatory surgical centers. It also mandated that abortion providers have admitting privileges at local hospitals.

Abortion rights supporters
Jo Ingles

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled against a Texas law that required doctors performing abortions in the Lone Star state to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and required abortion clinics to meet standards for ambulatory surgical centers.  How does that ruling affect Ohio?

State lawmakers have put in place restrictions on Ohio abortion clinics that are similar to those in Texas. So the leader of NARAL Pro Choice Ohio, Kellie Copeland, says the Supreme Court’s ruling against the state of Texas is a victory for abortion clinics in Ohio too.

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

Anti-abortion activists packed a hearing to determine the fate of an Ohio abortion clinic's license on Tuesday as the facility's operators argued they are meeting emergency requirements laid out in a 2013 law that has contributed to clinic closures around the state.
 
Women's Medical Center of Dayton has been grappling with Ohio's evolving licensing requirements for abortion providers for more than a decade. Attorney Jennifer Branch said the clinic planned to argue it has a plan for transferring patients when emergencies occur that is safe and complies with Ohio law.
 

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