Anti-abortion groups wants disciplinary action taken against a Kettering doctor who performed an abortion on a woman suspected of being high on heroin.


Both Dayton and Ohio Right To Life groups have filed a complaint with the State Medical Board based on information they received from an Ohio Department of Health report. It indicates that in 2015, the Women’s Med Center in Dayton performed an abortion on a 31-year-old woman who was physically unstable and incoherent, possibly due to a mix of pain pills and heroin.


The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

The Supreme Court’s ruling striking down a Texas abortion law may have repercussions in the Miami Valley.

The Texas law required abortion clinics to operate as ambulatory surgical centers. It also mandated that abortion providers have admitting privileges at local hospitals.

Abortion rights supporters
Jo Ingles

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled against a Texas law that required doctors performing abortions in the Lone Star state to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and required abortion clinics to meet standards for ambulatory surgical centers.  How does that ruling affect Ohio?

State lawmakers have put in place restrictions on Ohio abortion clinics that are similar to those in Texas. So the leader of NARAL Pro Choice Ohio, Kellie Copeland, says the Supreme Court’s ruling against the state of Texas is a victory for abortion clinics in Ohio too.

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

Anti-abortion activists packed a hearing to determine the fate of an Ohio abortion clinic's license on Tuesday as the facility's operators argued they are meeting emergency requirements laid out in a 2013 law that has contributed to clinic closures around the state.
Women's Medical Center of Dayton has been grappling with Ohio's evolving licensing requirements for abortion providers for more than a decade. Attorney Jennifer Branch said the clinic planned to argue it has a plan for transferring patients when emergencies occur that is safe and complies with Ohio law.

An Ohio House committee is set to consider possible changes to legislation regulating how abortion providers handle fetal remains.

One bill would require aborted fetuses to be buried, cremated or incinerated. The state's health director would help write the details.

A separate measure would require fetal remains to be buried or cremated, not incinerated. It leaves the decision up to the pregnant woman.

Stephanie Kight, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Ohio
Statehouse News

An Ohio bill that seeks to divert government money away from Planned Parenthood is headed to Republican Gov. John Kasich for his expected signature.

The GOP-led state House cleared the legislation Wednesday.

Stephanie Kight, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Ohio, says the federal money for preventative health care programs for low-income populations was awarded to Planned Parenthood after a competitive grant request process.

Joshua Lim – Scripps intern

Abortion is once again a front burner issue at the Ohio Statehouse right now, and lawmakers are taking action to defund Planned Parenthood and increase requirements for abortion providers. The Ohio Senate voted for a plan that would strip more than $1.2 million from the state’s Planned Parenthood clinics. Republican Senator Peggy Lehner says the reason for doing this is because of the organization’s choice.

“Planned Parenthood has chosen, you like the word choice, they have chosen to be the leading abortion provider in this state.”

Ohio Lawmakers who sponsored the fetal remains bill (Left to right: Representative Kyle Koehler, Robert McColley, Barbara Sears and Timothy Ginter)
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

  State lawmakers are introducing new legislation that would require women who have abortions or miscarriages to designate arrangements for burial or cremation of fetuses.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Planned Parenthood is suing Ohio's health director in a dispute over how the organization handles fetal tissue.

The federal lawsuit filed Sunday follows Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine's investigation into the group's affiliates.

DeWine's office found no evidence that Planned Parenthood made money from aborted fetuses, but the report instead criticized the facilities for disposing of fetal remains in landfills.

Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

State lawmakers went home for the holidays after approving bills creating regulations for ride sharing services, banning questions about criminal convictions on public sector job applications, and restoring a sales tax exemption for rare coins and bullion. But not included in the list is the controversial bill to defund Planned Parenthood.