WYSO

WYSO Weekend

Sunday, 10-10:30am

Welcome to WYSO Weekend where every Sunday morning, host Jerry Kenney brings you highlights from the week's news, issues, interviews, arts and cultural events from across the Miami Valley.  You'll also hear the latest stories from WYSO Community Voices producers, and features from Dayton Youth Radio, Senior Voices, County Lines and other series. 
 

In the latest installment of our series Bulletin Board Diaries we follow a lede found on a business card at a cafe ... to Cedarville University. That’s where we meet a man who found a creative way to battle his own depression –– through music.

Most people of a certain age have clear memories of the war in Vietnam. This week on Senior Voices, we hear from Brenda Stone. Born in 1939 and raised in Jefferson Township, she worked at the Delco Products plant in Kettering for twenty years. Brenda shared her thoughts on the war - and its impact - with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Hadley Drodge.

The story of Wilbur and Orville Wright has been told countless times. Two completely self-taught, self-funded brothers invent the airplane in the back of their West Dayton bike shop. The world was never the same. But the story of the Wright brothers’ background is even more unorthodox than it seems. In the late 1800s, during the heart of the Victorian Era, the Wright brothers’ mother inspired their mechanical aptitude. Community Voices producer Leo DeLuca has a story about Susan Catherine Koerner Wright.

 

A coalition of West Dayton religious groups is calling for a federal civil rights investigation into the shutdown of Good Samaritan hospital. Premier Health recently announced it will close the medical center later this year. WYSO’s Jess Mador has more. 

More than a hundred years ago, there were two young men at Central High School in downtown Dayton who became lifelong friends. Their lives were both tragically short, but full of consequence. One became Dayton’s first licensed African American doctor—the other the world’s first internationally acclaimed African American poet. Community Voices Producer Leo DeLuca has a story about Dr. William A. Burns, known as “Bud,” and his friend, Paul Laurence Dunbar.

 

This week on Senior Voices we meet Dorothy Johnson, born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi in 1938. She moved her family to Dayton in 1967, and spoke with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Ken Standifer, about her many years working at the Dayton VA. 

Young writers are often advised to "Write what you know." And we've found the young people of Dayton Youth Radio do just that. Project Coordinator, Basim Blunt, introduces us to this week’s story from Centerville High School. 

This year celebrates the 250th anniversary of the birth of Tecumseh and some of that celebration will take place at the Little Miami Conservancy Dinner on April 17th in Mason, Ohio. The keynote speaker will be writer and historian James Alexander Thom. He is the author of 'Panther in the Sky", "Follow the River", "Warrior Woman", and other novels. In this interview, Thom calls Tecumseh “one of the great American patriots” and says at the dinner he’ll talk to audience members about how the man’s life is still very relevant today.

 

Unmanned-aerial drone technology is changing the way we live and work. And it’s not just Amazon and other corporate giants getting into the drone game. The multi-billion-dollar industry is forecast to grow exponentially in coming years. In today’s installment of our Scratch innovation series, we’ll hear about some of the surprising ways drones are altering –– even enhancing –– the human experience. And, as I found out, as more drones take to the skies, the unmanned systems are raising new questions for business, government and law enforcement.     

 

  

A union representing Dayton school bus drivers has declared intent to strike after months of failed contract negotiations with the district. The announcement comes less than a year after the district narrowly avoided a teacher strike.

Despite growing awareness about the dangers of concussion, sports-related brain injury is common among student athletes. And, the diagnosis of concussion often depends on a symptom-screening test that’s subjective. In today’s installment of our Scratch innovation series, we hear about a new Dayton-based mobile app designed to make concussion screenings more objective. WYSOs Jess Mador reports its creators hope the app could keep more injured players off the field -- safe from repeated concussions and potentially fatal brain damage.

 

 

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