Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5 - 9am

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.Featuring local news, traffic and weather reports from around the Miami Valley. 

Genre: 

Pages

NPR Story
4:46 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 7:21 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with Twinkie trouble.

Hostess Brands, famous for processed treats like Twinkies and Ding Dongs, says it will go into liquidation if striking bakers do not return to work this afternoon. This could see the layoffs of nearly 18,000 workers. The bakers walked out over wage and benefit cuts. Analysts say the company's most iconic brands would likely be bought by other companies if Hostess goes out of business. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Politics
4:05 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Obama's Visit To Myanmar: Too Much, Too Soon?

A newspaper with a front-page photo of President Obama is displayed at a press house in downtown Yangon, Myanmar, on Thursday, ahead of Obama's visit.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 8:15 pm

When President Obama sets off to Asia this weekend to highlight his so-called pivot to the region, he will make a bit of history: Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Myanmar.

The country, also known as Burma, was a pariah state for decades, ruled by a ruthless military dictatorship. That is changing, and the Obama administration has encouraged a dramatic reform process in the country. But it may be too early for a victory lap.

Read more
Planet Money
4:04 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Why Coke Cost A Nickel For 70 Years

An oilcloth sign advertising Coca-Cola from 1905.
The Coca-Cola Company

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 2:04 pm

Prices change; that's fundamental to how economies work.

And yet: In 1886, a bottle of Coke cost a nickel. It was also a nickel in 1900, 1915 and 1930. In fact, 70 years after the first Coke was sold, you could still buy a bottle for a nickel.

Three wars, the Great Depression, hundreds of competitors — none of it made any difference for the price of Coke. Why not?

Read more
Around the Nation
7:35 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Airline Strips Cello Of Frequent Flyer Miles

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:31 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Police Pick Up Car Thief Turned Delivery Man

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. A driver delivering takeout for a Chinese restaurant left his car running while he ran in an order. He comes back and guess what? No car. He called his boss, who called the next customer on the route to apologize. But they had their takeout. The car thief-turned delivery man made a few extra bucks. But at the next house on his route the cops were waiting. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Pages