WYSO

Wilmington Speaker Series To Highlight African-American, Abolitionist, and Quaker History

Jan 30, 2018

This spring 2018, the Quaker Heritage Center is facilitating a series of talks and musical performances that highlight the power of solidarity and resistance among African-Americans, Abolitionists, and Quakers. At the same time, these programs will address the complicated dynamics of white and African-American abolitionists who were entangled in systems of privilege and oppression throughout the 19th century.
Credit Photo provided by Wilmington College

Education is obviously the main focus of any educational institution's mission, and Wilmington College's upcoming speaker series will not only educate but tie historical perspectives to current events.

 

To find out more about the series, we spoke with Tanya Maus, director of the Peace Resource Center and Quaker Heritage Center at Wilmington, and Ursula McTaggart, an associate professor of English there.

 

First Maus tells us more about the Heritage Center and overall the impact of the speaker’s series for students and others.

 

 

Details provided by the Quaker Heritage Center at Wilmington College:

 

Schedule of Events

(Directions to Campus and a Campus Map may be found HERE)

Thursday, February 1, 2018, 7:00 p.m.
T. Canby Jones Meeting House, Quaker Heritage Center
“Harriet Beecher Stowe: Anti-Slavery Advocate and Friend of Friends”
with Ms. Christina Hartlieb, Director, Harriet Beecher-Stowe House

Thursday, February 15, 2018, 7:00 p.m.
T. Canby Jones Meeting House, Quaker Heritage Center
"Of Thee We Sing: Black Music and the Quest for Equality in Post Reconstruction America." 
with Dr. Tammy Kernodle of Miami University

A note from Dr. Kernodle: "The italicized "we" is a reference to the way Marian Anderson sang this line from "My Country This of Thee," at her famous 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial.  I will use this as a historical guidepost to center the discussion on how music became the terrain through which black advocated for social equality during the late 19th century beginning with the Fisk Jubilee Singers in 1871."

Thursday, February 22, 2018, 7:00 p.m.
T. Canby Jones Meeting House, Quaker Heritage Center
“Targets of the Riot: Gender, Violence, and Interracial Abolitionism in Antebellum Washington, D.C”
with Dr. Tamika Nunley, Oberlin College

TUESDAY, March 6, 2-18, 1:00-2:30 p.m.
T. Canby Jones Meeting House, Quaker Heritage Center
Talk: "Negro Spirituals of the 19th Century"
with La'Shelle Allen and members of Spirituals in Motion

TUESDAY, March 6, 2-18, 1:00-2:30 p.m.
T. Canby Jones Meeting House, Quaker Heritage Center
Performance: "Negro Spirituals of the 19th Century"
with La'Shelle Allen and members of Spirituals in Motion

For more information contact: qhc@wilmington.edu or call 937-481-2371

Brought to you by the Quaker Heritage Center; Issues and Artists, Music and Theater, the Social Sciences Area, The Department of History;  the Office of Diversity and Inclusion of Wilmington College, and the Peace Resource Center.