WYSO

Vick Mickunas

Host - Book Nook

Vick Mickunas introduced the Book Nook author interview program for WYSO in 1994. Over the years he has produced more than 1500 interviews with writers, musicians, poets, politicians, and celebrities. Listen to the Book Nook with Vick Mickunas for intimate conversations about books with the writers who create them.  Vick Mickunas reviews books for the Dayton Daily News and the Springfield News Sun.

Ways to Connect

After leaving the White House Ronald Reagan maintained an office in Los Angeles. It was a busy place; he met with dignitaries, celebrities, and ordinary Americans at his office. Peggy Grande was there, she became the former president's executive assistant, the person who managed his busy schedule. She got to know him quite well.
 

Brian Alexander is a writer who is based in San Diego. He grew up in Lancaster, Ohio. Alexander had been considering his next book project when he paid a visit to his old hometown. He was astonished to discover that this once thriving community had fallen on hard times. The manufacturing base in Lancaster has been in decline for some time. Alexander realized that his next book project should to be an investigation of what happened to this sweet little town.
 

With the publication of "I Let You Go" last year Clare Mackintosh won the attention of over a million mystery readers who loved her tightly woven and spectacularly clever book. How does one follow up on a debut novel that sizzled like that one did?

Jeb Card is a professor at Miami University at Oxford and one of the editors of this essay collection. These essays delve into various aspects of our fascination with archaeology and the many variants of pseudoarchaeology that have attracted believers and adherents over the years.
 
In this interview Jeb Card describes how some artifacts that were supposedly from the lost continent of Mu were found in the archives at his university. These essays take readers from the Lost White City of Honduras through "Archaeology as Ghost Hunting."

For most of us life is one long series of compromises. We have to make compromises because we want to exist in a society that is often at odds with our own feelings, opinions, and beliefs.
 

In Laird Hunt's latest novel "The Evening Road" his character Ottie Lee has reluctantly allowed herself to make compromises just to get by. Her marriage has become a compromise. Her relationship with her boss involves compromises. And as this story builds her participation in a hideous spectacle, a lynching, becomes just another thing that finds her being swept along by events.

Thirty years ago the Scottish novelist Ian Rankin published the first book in his crime series that features the Edinburgh cop John Rebus. A few years ago Rankin tried to retire his ageing sleuth but Rebus and the many fans of these books would not go along with the plan. So even though Rebus continues to age in real time Rankin brought him back to work some cold cases.
 

Gabrielle Civil is a performance artist. "Swallow the Fish" is her memoir. In this book the author reveals how she became a performance artist and how she approaches her craft. The author admits that her work is political and she confesses that while she is performing she is trying to remain present inside her body. She describes a number of the pieces which she has performed. There are numerous photographs as well as essays about this author's experiences, inspirations, and beliefs.

Lara Elena Donnelly has just published "Amberlough." It is her debut novel. It was published by Tor Books, a major New York publisher. Lara grew up in Yellow Springs and had always wanted to be a writer. She has pursued her dreams with passion and now her determination and diligence is really paying off.

Listen to this interview to find out what her story is about and to learn about the journey that has brought her to this happy place in her life.

I read a lot of crime novels and some of them are very good. Occasionally I'll read one that completely dazzles me. "The Butcher's Hook" by Janet Ellis is one of those books that made me perspire with shock and astonishment. And this is her literary debut! Amazing.

Have you ever heard of Mrs. Sherlock Holmes? I had not either. I had always assumed that our fictional sleuth was a devoted bachelor. Well, back in the early years of the 20th century there was a real living person who acquired the nickname "Mrs. Sherlock Holmes." Her name was Grace Humiston and she lived in New York City, not London.
 

Pages