WYSO

Vick Mickunas

Host - Book Nook

Vick Mickunas introduced the Book Nook author interview program for WYSO in 1994. Over the years he has produced more than 1500 interviews with writers, musicians, poets, politicians, and celebrities. Listen to the Book Nook with Vick Mickunas for intimate conversations about books with the writers who create them.  Vick Mickunas reviews books for the Dayton Daily News and the Springfield News Sun.

Ways to Connect

As I am interviewing authors I am always trying to think of the best questions to ask them. I want to keep things fresh and that can be a challenge. A number of years ago I interviewed C-Span's Brian Lamb. As the host of that network's Book TV program Lamb has distinguished himself as one of the best prepared author interviewers around. Like me, he's accustomed to being the one who is asking the questions. He seemed slightly uncomfortable with having that role reversed.

Loudon Wainwright III has spent the past half century writing and performing songs that range from whimsical to confessional to downright silly. This clever man possesses a brilliant wit. His distinctive voice continues to entertain, provoke, and amuse. Now that voice has been transferred to the pages of a candid memoir called "Liner Notes."

Once upon a time it was possible to live in Manhattan inexpensively. It wasn't that long ago really. There were neighborhoods like the Lower East Side where artists, club kids, and squatters were still able to eke out livelihoods in the vibrant city that continues to attract newcomers from every corner of the globe.

Tana French returned to the program to talk about her latest Dublin Murder Squad novel "The Trespasser."  Last year Tana did an interview for the hardcover release of this book and I could not resist the opportunity to talk to her again because I loved this story and she doesn't put out new books very often.

Bruce Campbell has had a long acting career. He recently published his second memoir. If you don't recognize his name you'll probably recognize his face. You'll say, oh yeah, that guy! Here's a link to his Wikipedia page that provides an accounting of some of the projects he has undertaken.

Kathi Reed returned to the program to discuss her latest novel "Trouble for Rent." This book is a prequel to Reed's debut effort "Banking on Trouble." In this one Annie Fillmore is running her mom and pop video rental store in a small town in Ohio. The year is 1990 and the video rental business was at the height of what was to be a brief but highly lucrative run.

C.J. Box concludes his "Highway Quartet" with "Paradise Valley." A serial killer known as "The Lizard King" has been preying on truck stop prostitutes for years and he is finally slowing down. As this diabolical psychopath heads back to the wild western lands where he grew up he is leaving a trail of carnage behind him. And, in a weirdly twisted manner he is trying to recreate a family unit consisting of hostages he has harvested from among the innocents who have had the misfortune to meet him.

Iveta Jusova grew up in Czechoslovakia. She wasn't that aware of feminism until she went away to college. At the university she immersed herself in learning about it and her studies became the gateway to her future career.  In this collection of essays readers will discover that the development of feminism in a socialist society and in what is now the Czech Republic bore some significant differences from the feminist movements in countries like England and the United States.

Astrea Taylor returned to our studios to discuss her latest book, "Belle Dame Sans Merci," an urban fantasy novel that showcases the author's vivid imagination. The main character is a woman who has become a demon. She is trying to improve her karma enough to be admitted to heaven. Until she does so she'll continue with her lethal labors for a truly devilish boss. Taylor's vision of the precincts of hell is complex and profoundly amusing.

Fiona Barton served notice with her debut novel "The Widow" that she is a rising star in the world of crime fiction. Her second effort, "The Child," is just as compelling as her first book. Barton had a long career as a journalist and that background has served her well. Kate, her fictional investigative reporter has returned in the second book but don't think that just because she is back that these two books mark the start of a series. They don't. These are stand-alone thrillers.

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